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Harley-Davidson Dirtytail Is an Arizona-Style Softail Classic

Being in the business of supplying people with motorcycle parts is often not enough for the ones running these enterprises, and oftentimes we see them getting involved in actually making (or remaking) bikes. Some are so good at it that they get inducted in the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum and Hall of Fame.
Harley-Davidson Dirtytail 21 photos
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This is what happened in 2015 to John Shope, the mastermind behind an Arizona-based garage called Dirty Bird Concepts. The man has been in the business of remaking Softails, Fatboys and Dynas for years, and his projects have won the industry’s recognition on more than one occasion.

It’s not that often though that a Dirty Bird comes out on the open market, so finding one on the lot of motorcycles going under the Mecum hammer at the end of the month was quite the stroke of luck.

It’s called Dirtytail, and is a custom build on the classic side of things, based on a 2012 Heritage Softail Classic. Dirty Bird’s work can be seen all over the massaged chrome, black and tan body, but most specifically at the front and rear.

The bike was gifted with a custom swingarm that supports an air ride suspension hidden in the shock towers, which we’re told is still functional. Up front we get a large 26-inch Rideright spoke wheel and a bagger kit. 18-inch ape hangers can be found further up, while moving back we get a custom leather dash and seat.

The whole build ends with the element that wears the most of Shope’s touch, and the element that partially helped name the motorcycle: an upsweeping twin fish tail exhaust, flanking a custom rear fender made by Klockwerks.

We’re told the Dirtytail is ready to roll on the road once the new owner gets their hands on it, but we’re not being given any indication as to how much the bike is expected to fetch during the auction.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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