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Family-Owned 1970 Oldsmobile Cutlass Is an Unexpected Barn Find With Everything Original

Part of the third-generation lineup, the 1970 Cutlass could be ordered in no more, no less than 7 body styles, with three different coupe variations.
1970 Oldsmobile Cutlass 9 photos
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The convertible obviously wasn’t necessarily the most common choice, especially as the focus was mostly on coupes, and while no official production numbers are available today, it’s believed a Cutlass with a removable top is kind of rare.

One of them is right here, allegedly after spending a long time in storage. Described as a barn find, this Cutlass Supreme is one of the convertibles built by Oldsmobile for the model year 1970. But the more impressive thing is that the car looks almost as good as on day one.

Unfortunately, not a lot of specifics are offered, and in many ways, this Cutlass raises more questions than answers.

It’s not clear just how long this convertible has been sitting, but regardless of the answer, it’s pretty clear the vehicle has been parked just in the right conditions. There’s no rust on the body, and while the paint looks a bit faded on the hood, there’s a chance the only thing the car needs is some minor TLC.

With everything still original, the Cutlass runs and drives just like on day one, according to the owner, who has recently posted the car on Craigslist. Part of the same family since new, it was born (and still comes) with a 350 (5.7-liter) Rocket V8 engine, which should theoretically produce around 310 horsepower.

Obviously, the vehicle has never been restored, so at the end of the day, it’s a survivor that only needs a new home where its current condition can be properly preserved.

Getting your hands on this Oldsmobile, however, isn’t going to be easy or affordable. The seller wants to get no more, no less than $32,500 for the car, and if you’re still not convinced it’s worth the money, just head over to San Jose to see it in person.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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