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Cutaway C8 Corvette Featured on Engineered Explained, Jason Points Out 5 "Flaws"

As opposed to other YouTube channels with an automotive theme – well, most other – Engineering Explained delves deep into what makes a car good or bad. In this episode, Jason Fenske is much obliged to point out five “genuinely impressive flaws” of the mid-engine Corvette in Stingray specification.
Cutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering Explained 12 photos
Cutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedCutaway C8 Corvette on Engineering ExplainedC8 Corvette with all-season tires and summer tires
Thanks to General Motors, the YouTuber has also received a life-sized cutaway and a series-production C8 to show what kind of engineering and packaging solutions went into the newest version of America’s definitive sports car.

One of the risks that Team Chevy took early in the development process is the brake-by-wire system. This technology is more common in hybrid and electric vehicles, and the electric parking brake is a by-wire system too.

Regarding the “impressive flaws” mentioned in the intro, Jason explains that the C8 can stop to a grinding halt “even if the brake fluid boils.” The feature is called eBoost after the control module, vacuum pump and booster, and master cylinder – all combined into a single package. Even more surprising is that the midship Corvette is capable of braking even if the electronics fail.

What comes as a bit of a disappointment is that the stopping distance of the C8 pales in comparison to the C7. According to Corvette engineers, “there are a couple of reasons for it.” First and foremost, the eighth generation has a 60/40 weight distribution as opposed to the seventh generation’s 50/50 ratio.

Stepping on the brake pedal means that more weight shifts from the rear to the front of the vehicle, loading the front tires and challenging the anti-lock braking system’s electronic brain. The second reason for this comes in the guise of rear-wheel braking, which is limited because it would otherwise make the rear end twitchy in the case of an evasive maneuver like the moose test.

The third curious yet explainable fault is understeer. Once again, weight distribution plays a big role in the car’s handling dynamics. The 60/40 weight distribution, however, also makes it easy to make small corrections in the middle of the corner. Dropping the tire pressure to 23 psi up front and 24 psi at the rear should help on the track. Trail braking should help too.

For whatever reason, Jason includes the pushrod-style engine under “genuinely impressive flaws” even though that’s not exactly the case. The small-block V8 is a testament to American engineering, and the LS-based evolution of this engine is known for being reliable and easy to service.

The LT2 in the C8 is a little different from the LT1 in the C7 Corvette, starting with the equal length runners and bigger intake manifold. As you all know, the sports exhaust of the Z51 Performance Package unlocks a few more ponies and torques. To the point, the crank ratings are 495 HP and 470 pound-feet.

Last, but not least, all-season tires. Some may be underwhelmed by Chevy’s choice in regard to rubber, but then again, the non-Z51 model is meant to be all things to all people – a compromise if you will.

But on the other hand, Jason’s Mazda MX-5 with Bridgestone Potenza RE71R summer tires doesn’t stop as hard despite the lower weight of the roadster.

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