autoevolution
 

C8 Corvette “Razzle Dazzle” Rendering Looks Like a Small-Block V8 Zebra

During World War I and World War II, there was this thing called razzle dazzle in the U.S. or dazzle camouflage in the United Kingdom. The effectiveness of the psychedelic pattern is still debated, but one thing is certain. The experimental camouflage served as inspiration for Cubism, a movement that was pioneered by Pablo Picasso.
C8 Corvette with dazzle camouflage 22 photos
Photo: Spy The Designer on artstation.com
C8 Corvette with dazzle camouflageC8 Corvette with dazzle camouflage2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile2020 Chevrolet Corvette convertbile
This C8 Corvette with razzle dazzle, however, doesn’t fool anyone about its size or the direction it’s driving. Rendered by Spy The Designer, the two-tone sports car further boasts go-faster stripes in black as well as black wheels, Z51 rear wing, side mirrors, and hash marks on the front fenders. The camouflage gets wilder at the rear end, and if you look closely, the glass engine cover is finished in an extremely dark tint like the other windows.

Even though the zebra camouflage isn’t available from the factory, Chevrolet is much obliged to sell you full-length racing stripes in Carbon Flash Metallic for $995, black wheels for $2,695, hash marks for $245, and Carbon Flash Metallic-painted mirror caps for $100. As a coupe with a removable roof, the C8 Corvette Stingray can be optioned to the tune of approximately $104,000 at the time of writing this article.

Coined by Norman Wilkinson in 1918 after taking inspiration from the concepts of disruptive camouflage by Abbot Handerson Tayer, dazzle camouflage is pretty much obsolete in modern warfare. Its influence, however, soldiers on thanks to numerous artists who like the geometric distortions of black and white stripes.

Many color combinations were used in WWI but dazzle paint reverted to black, white, and sometimes blue by the end of the war. This type of camouflage reappeared in the Royal Navy in January 1940, and even the Germany Navy razzled the dazzle in the Norwegian campaign. However, the advances in radar technology reduced the effectiveness of the artistic scheme considerably compared to WWI.

While on the subject of camouflage, the United States Army has converted to Operational Camouflage Pattern – codenamed Scorpion W2 – in 2015. UCP – short for Universal Camouflage Pattern – was retired in 2019, four years after the introduction of OCP.
If you liked the article, please follow us:  Google News icon Google News Youtube Instagram X (Twitter)
About the author: Mircea Panait
Mircea Panait profile photo

After a 1:43 scale model of a Ferrari 250 GTO sparked Mircea's interest for cars when he was a kid, an early internship at Top Gear sealed his career path. He's most interested in muscle cars and American trucks, but he takes a passing interest in quirky kei cars as well.
Full profile

 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories