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1955 Dodge Firebomb Started World's Longest Assembly Line, Now Is Up for Grabs

One of the rarest and least known car lineups in the world had the name of Dual Ghia. The models were the brainchild of Detroit industrialist Gene Casaroll and his Dual Motors company, and were in production for only two years, starting 1956, but managed to impress Hollywood A-listers and others alike.
1955 Dodge Firebomb 28 photos
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During the production years, just 104 units of Dual Ghias were made, thanks to an Italian-American effort between Ghia and Dual Motors. Because of this, a production Dual Ghia is extremely difficult to find today. Naturally, one would think the prototype that started the breed was all but impossible to find.

Yet, the car just popped up on the Mecum website, and it is for sale, not at an auction, but by contacting the auction house directly.

The prototype you see in the gallery above, known as the Dodge Firebomb, is from 1955, when it was shown by the builder in Detroit. And is a jewel to behold. Constructed around a modified Dodge chassis, it features a body sculpted by Italian house Ghia, a full folding top with glass back window. Under the hood sits a HEMI engine linked to Chrysler running gear, and it is capable of developing 270 hp.

Back when these cars rolled off the lines, putting one of the Dual-Ghias together was not an easy task, and was done on what was named at the time the world's longest assembly line. The Dodge chassis and the drivetrain had to be shipped to Italy, where they received the bodywork, and were sent back to the U.S. for the finishing touches.

Despite the stunning looks, the performance and the efforts that went into making one, Dual Ghias sold as new back in the 1950s for $7,500, just $200 over the price of some of the other luxury cars available at the time, but much cheaper than others.

 
 
 
 
 

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