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Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX Is Fresh From Japan, Looks Like a Great Camper

The Toyota HiAce is a light commercial vehicle built mostly for Asian markets but becoming more popular in the U.S. as they pass the 25-year mark. The fourth-generation HiAce, like this 1995 example on Bring a Trailer, is the last that can be legally imported into the U.S. as of now.
1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer 18 photos
1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer1995 Toyota HiAce Super Custom Living Saloon EX on Bring a Trailer
The fourth generation Toyota HiAce was built like a tank, sharing the legendary reliability with the unkillable HiLux from the Top Gear show. The 1KZ 3.0-liter diesel engine has a good reputation, as proven while powering the Toyota Prado and the HiLux mentioned above. Although both rear-wheel drive and four-wheel drive are available, this 1995 example comes with the former setup. Despite its 27-year age, it still looks modern and well equipped. It owes that to the Super Custom trim, the second-highest available in Japan.

The Living Saloon EX designates the passenger version of the HiAce van. Still, this example has already been through a light conversion. The third row of seats was removed while still in Japan, and an aftermarket sleeping platform has been installed instead. While this features additional storage compartments beneath, we’re sure a more elegant solution can be arranged. Depending on what you want with the van, you can either find a cheap third row of seats or strip everything and convert the HiAce into a proper camper.

We should say that the van is excellent for this purpose as it is, offering a lot of versatility. The second row of seats can be rotated 180 degrees or folded flat. If you need inspiration for your next DIY job, look no further than this HiAce, which shows what can be done when you’re not short of skills. There’s plenty of space there for a kitchenette and a sleeping platform. At the minimum, you can install a camper box in the rear and keep the passenger area untouched.

As beautiful as this Toyota HiAce is, we’re puzzled why very few people have expressed their interest. Perhaps people dislike the right-hand drive? After two days on the market, the auction on Bring a Trailer registered 22 comments but only three bids. The first one was just $1, with the subsequent bids raising the stake to $101 and $234, respectively. We’re sure the selling dealer must be in panic by now, especially as this is a no-reserve sale.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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