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Tesla Publishes Its 2015 Delivery Figures. They're Pretty Good

Tesla Motors, one of the biggest names in the EV market, has recently stated that the company delivered 17,400 vehicles in the fourth quarter of 2015 and a total of 50,580 throughout the entire year.
Tesla Model S 2 photos
Tesla Model X
The Palo Alto-based carmaker has released figures that show that 17,192 Model S vehicles were delivered in the fourth quarter of 2015, which means a 48% growth over the prior quarter and 75% more than Q4 of last year. The company also delivered 208 Model X cars, in line with the early stages of the model production ramp, according to Tesla. The daily production range for the Model X has also increased to 238 vehicles being produced every week.

There is still a small margin - under 1% - to these numbers, as the American company insists on defining a delivery only if the car is transferred to the end customer and all paperwork is correct.

Although these figures show some progress, Tesla might want to step up its game in the near future. A lot of companies, mostly Chinese-backed, like Faraday Future which will launch its first concept car at the 2016 International Consumer Electronics Show, the Shanghai-based NextEv, or Atieva, are all aiming to uncrown Tesla Motors.

Faraday Future seems to be Tesla’s main rival, at least on paper, as recently the Chinese-backed company received a $335 million motivation package from the Nevada lawmakers. This move raised a lot of questions because giving away that much money to a company that hasn’t unveiled a concept car yet nor released any other products on the market doesn't sound like a very good idea.

The same Nevada legislators were kind enough to Tesla too, as they offered a $1.3 billion motivational package for the company to build its battery manufacturing factory outside Reno.

Tesla Motors was founded back in 2003 by Elon Musk, Martin Eberhard, Marc Tarpenning, JB Straubel and Ian Wright. The company is named after electrical engineer and physicist Nikola Tesla. One of the company’s cars, the Tesla Roadster, used an AC motor descended directly from Tesla’s original 1882 design.

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