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Saudi F-15 Strike Eagles Put on a Show Breaking Away From a B-1B Lancer Over the Red Sea

I personally do not know first-hand any Air Force pilots, but by the looks of it, these guys seem to have a lot of fun doing their job. Granted, it’s a dangerous job, but one that comes with thrills and sensations the rest of us inconsequential mortals don’t ever come to experience.
Three Saudi F-15 Strike Eagles and an American B-1B Lancer 28 photos
Three Saudi F-15 Strike Eagles and an American B-1B LancerF-15C Eagles over JapanBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXBoeing F-15EXB-1B Lancer landing at Naval Support Facility Diego GarciaB-1B Lancer over the Persian GulfB-1B Lancer taking off from UK baseB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B LancerB-1B Lancer at Edwards Air Force Base
We can tell that it’s so by the large amount of exciting photos the Air Force (USAF) constantly keeps releasing in an attempt to both deter America’s enemies, and reassure the American people that they’re in great hands, both local and allied. These images show much more than a cold arsenal of hardware – they show the joy of the people operating said hardware, just like we have here.

The pic (click the main photo to enlarge and get the full experience) was taken back at the end of October over the Red Sea, at a time when an American B-1B Lancer was flying “as part of a presence patrol above the U.S. Central Command’s area of responsibility.”

Being a bomber, the Lancer sometimes goes about its missions accompanied by fighter aircraft, and in this case, taking turns in guarding the behemoth, were ”multiple partner nations’ fighter aircraft,” which joined the party at different stages of the flight, then left to make room for others.

Such a changing-of-the-guard moment is captured in this pic. Three Royal Saudi Air Force F-15 Strike Eagles are seen breaking away from the American bomber, and making for an amazing shot as they leave room for others to come in and continue the journey.

The Red Sea was about mid-way through the patrol mission which started in the Gulf of Aden, traveled over the Arabian Gulf and the straight of Hormuz, and exited the scene through the Gulf of Oman.

Currently not engaged in any major conflict, the USAF is often flexing its aerial muscle in patrol missions over areas that have been known to (or have the potential of) becoming hot at a moment’s notice.

Editor's note: Gallery shows other F-15s and Lancers.

 
 
 
 
 

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