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Omani Eurofighter Typhoons Trail B-52 Stratofortress in Almost Perfect Symmetry

Every time we stumble across some exciting photo of military gear in action, we get all worked up, as you never know what opportunities a closer look at it will reveal.
Omani Eurofighter Typhoon escorting B-52 Stratofortress 16 photos
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The main image of this piece first drew us in on account of the stunning symmetry the three airplanes are flying in. And we’re not overusing the word stunning here, as the pilots sitting inside each of the planes, American and Omani, are not used to flying together for the cameras, like say people from aerobatics teams do.

The photo shows an American B-52H Stratofortress, a bomber we’ve talked about on several occasions here in autoevolution’s Photo of the Day section, but also two Eurofighter Typhoons. And it’s these two planes that got us all worked up, as we don’t cross paths with them all that often.

Described by its maker, multinational company Eurofighter Jagdflugzeug, as the “world’s most advanced swing-role combat aircraft,” the Typhoon first flew into service in 2003 and is now one of the workhorses of seven Air Forces, including the ones defending the UK, Germany, Italy, and Spain.

Made with composite materials for a low radar signature, the plane packs a couple of Eurojet turbofan engines with afterburners, each capable of 90 kN of thrust and of shooting the airplane to a top speed of Mach 2. The Typhoon can travel for distances of up to 2,900 km (1,800 miles) and at altitudes of up to over 19,000 meters (65,000 feet).

The airplane can carry into combat short-range air-to-air missiles (SRAAM), beyond-visual-range (BVR) air-to-air missiles, bombs, and a 27mm cannon.

The two Typhoons seen here escorting the Stratofortress belong to the Royal Air Force of Oman and were flying over the Sultanate at the end of March when they were captured in this pic. The American bomber was flying in from all the way over in the UK, crossing the East Mediterranean, Arabian Peninsula, and the Red Sea in the process.

Editor's note: Gallery shows various Eurofighter Typhoons.

 
 
 
 
 

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