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Italian Supercar Makers are Struggling to Adapt to Electric Cars, Shocks No One

When I see the latest news regarding Italian supercar makers struggling mightily to adapt to a rapidly electrifying global auto industry, I'm reminded of a conversation I once had with an old colleague of mine and a total Lambo aficionado, Stephen Rivers.
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He told all that time ago that as much as he loved Lamborghini, he was wary about how well they'd react to the transition toward EVs that spares no automaker. Based on the latest report from Jack Ewing of the New York Times, Stephen was right to be skeptical. If anything, he was ahead of the curve by a year or so. Sure, school children in the Italian town of Sant'Agata Bolognese still walk home every afternoon to the sounds of thumping great V12s at the moment.

But now that nearly all European Union nations and key U.S. states like New York, California, and Illinois are slated to transition fully to EV infrastructure in the next decade, it seems Lambo might fare the worst of all. Perhaps even worse so than their rivals at Ferrari. As of 2022, Ferrari has but a single plug-in electric hybrid supercar, the venerable SF90 Stradale. Yet, according to the NYT report, it won't unveil a fully electric supercar until at least 2025.

All the while, Lamborghini does indeed plan to unveil a PHEV of its own by at least 2023, with a full EV soon to follow. But as my chat with Stephen revealed, there's no way to tell for certain if the lack of a flagship naturally aspirated V12 will be more of a hindrance for Lamborghini than it would be for Ferrari.

At a time when the Italian auto industry is reeling in a way, it hasn't since the end of World War II, including Fiat's market share dipping below four percent in Europe, Ferrari and Lamborghini represent the final gasps of Italian pride in their automobiles. It's a pride that may very well be under threat if global governments force them to electrify or be eliminated. Maybe finally replacing the Aventador would be a good first step.

 
 
 
 
 

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