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H1 2023 Full-Size Pickup Truck Sales Report: GM Dukes It Out With Ford, Ram Ranks Third

The Ford Motor Company paints itself as being America's number one truck manufacturer in the first half of 2023, but that's not true in terms of full-size trucks. F-Series deliveries totaled 382,893, including 8,757 examples of the all-electric F-150 Lightning.
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That's 27.9 and 281.4 percent better than in the first half of 2023 for the F-Series and F-150 Lightning, respectively. General Motors reported 411,299 deliveries for its light-, heavy-, and medium-duty trucks. If we eliminate the MDs, make that 407,078 trucks.

General Motors – the biggest of the Big Three automakers in Detroit – delivered more full-size pickups in the first quarter of 2023 than FoMoCo stateside. Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra deliveries totaled 268,291 and 143,008 units, respectively. Of those, the Silverado MD moved a meager 4,221 trucks during this period. As for the Ram P/U, which includes the DS-gen 1500 Classic and the DT from the 1500 up, the Auburn Hills-based automaker reported 223,049 deliveries.

Even though year-to-date sales are up 59,735 from 2022, the Tundra still cannot dream of catching up to the American establishment. When it comes to Nissan, the Titan seems to be on life support. Only 10,550 units were delivered in the first six months of 2023, or 5.9 percent fewer trucks than in H1 2022.

With a bit of luck, General Motors could surprise us by the end of the year. But still, bear in mind we're still quite a few months from the finish line. Everything can happen in the second half of 2023, including supply chain-related issues that may affect all brands across the automotive industry, not only Ford, GM, and Ram.

On the other hand, General Motors doesn't have a sufficiently good full-size truck lineup at press time. Its light-duty Silverado and Sierra don't hold a candle to the F-150, their electric versions have slim chances of catching up to the Lightning, and the heavy-duty truck lineup also leaves much to be desired. Take, for instance, the sheer difference in peak torque between the Duramax V8 and Power Stroke V8 diesels.

The F-150 currently retails from $34,445 (excluding destination freight charge), whereas the Super Duty kicks off at $43,970. The work-oriented F-150 Lightning Pro is sold out for the rest of the model year, and it's rather pricey as well at $59,974. Over at General Motors, the Silverado 1500 is $36,300, while the Silverado HD starts at $43,400. Shockingly enough, the Silverado EV 4WT is an eye-watering $77,905.

Toyota doesn't offer a heavy-duty version of the Tundra. Rather, half-ton versions with either twin-turbo V6 or twin-turbo V6 hybrid muscle will have to make do. Priced at $38,965, the Tundra is slightly more affordable than the Titan's $39,950 starting price. Step up to the XD, and you're looking at $47,590.
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 Download: H1 2023 US full-size truck sales (PDF)

About the author: Mircea Panait
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After a 1:43 scale model of a Ferrari 250 GTO sparked Mircea's interest for cars when he was a kid, an early internship at Top Gear sealed his career path. He's most interested in muscle cars and American trucks, but he takes a passing interest in quirky kei cars as well.
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