autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
Ducati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon Enough
We've known about the fact that MotoE will be transitioning from Energica to Ducati for its 2023 season for a while now. The all-electric motorcycle racing series has been around since 2019, and this move marks the beginning of a new era for emission-free racing on two wheels. Not all Ducati fans are happy with the new electric bike, but if we will end up relying solely on battery power in the future this might be an important step for us to follow.

Ducati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon Enough

Ducati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon EnoughDucati MotoE Prototype Reveals Its Secrets, 2023 Can't Come Soon Enough
Ducati has just released more information concerning the V21L prototype that is set to compete next year in MotoE. A total of 18 motorcycles will be part of the line-up for the electric series. And some details have already been made available to the public through official Ducati channels.

As you would expect with a project of this scale, the Italian motorcycle manufacturer created a special team composed of both Ducati and Ducati Corse representatives to handle the development. We now know how much the electric prototype weighs.

But before looking into that, let's see how heavy other road-going, electric motorcycles are right now. The Energica Ego clocks in at 282 kg (621 lbs), and it provides access to 107 kW (145 horsepower) and 148 lb-ft (200 Nm) of torque. The Zero SR/S has a curb weight of 518 lbs (235 kg) and has a peak performance reading of 82 kW (110 hp) and 140 lb-ft (190 Nm) of torque.

Although it's in a different class of bikes, let's look at the Harley-Davidson LiveWire as well. Its engine can deliver up to 75 kW (100 hp) and 84 lb-ft (113 Nm) of torque, while weight figures are up at 562 lbs (254 kg).

Now that we have a benchmark for comparison, let's get back to the Ducati prototype. The engineers have come up with a pretty smart solution for integrating the battery pack into the chassis. It weighs a hefty 242 lbs (110 kg) and has a capacity of 18 kWh. Here's a reminder that a Moto3 motorcycle weighs about 176 lbs (80 kg).

Of course, we are just scratching the surface in terms of electric power and storage development, so we shouldn't be quick to judge here. The whole prototype weighs 496 lbs (225 kg), which is 26 lbs (12 kg) lighter than the minimum requirements imposed by Dorna and FIM.

Performance-wise, the V21L is rated at 110 kW (150 horsepower) and 103 lb-ft (140 Nm) of torque. With that in mind, it was capable of getting up to 170 mph (275 kph) during a test at Mugello. So how does it fare against the Energica Ego Corsa? Well, it's slightly down on power and torque.

But it makes up for that in terms of weight. The Ego Corsa is almost 48 lbs (22 kg) heavier than the V21L. And that's going to feel like a significant difference for any rider that will have experienced both bikes.

Working in close connection with riders like Michele Pirro, Alex de Angelis, and Chaz Davies, Ducati applied the same MotoGP methodology for the development of the bike. Even though the V21L has a completely different power unit, the electronics used have been fine-tuned to mimic the behavior of a motorcycle that still relies on an internal combustion engine.

As the MotoE partnership is set to run through 2026, we're bound to see a significant development of Ducati's electric bike by then. We just have to get used to hearing knee-sliders scraping the asphalt instead of the usual ICE exhaust notes. It should be noted that the Italian manufacturer is still working on this prototype, as they've stated it's about 75% ready for action. So we might be getting an update on their progress in a few months time.



 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories