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Custom-Made Yamaha SR400 Green Is the Very Definition of Charming, Bears Scrambler Cues

This two-wheeled gem may not have that much power on tap, but its personality certainly makes up for it.
Yamaha SR400 Green 14 photos
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No matter what styling approach they choose to employ in their endeavors, Analog Motorcycles do an exceptional job at nailing it every single time! There’s been no shortage of occasions when the work of Tony Prust and his crew was enthusiastically showcased on autoevolution, and we’re about to add yet another such instance to our list.

This time around, Analog’s starting point was a 2015 variant of the long-running Yamaha SR400 range, which they’ve nicknamed Green following the project’s completion. Since the powertrain-related mods turned out to be fairly straightforward, we might as well get them out of the way first.

Happy to leave the bike’s air-cooled 399cc thumper internally unchanged, Tony’s specialists focused their efforts on the exhaust. They began by treating the header with a layer of ceramic coating, then proceeded to swap its stock silencer with a Cone Engineering module. Of course, there’s nothing too wild about these tweaks, but things got a lot spicier when it came to the running gear.

Race Tech supplied premium springs and emulators for the SR400’s forks, while its factory shock absorbers have been replaced with Super Shox alternatives. Moreover, the wheels were rebuilt and powder-coated black, subsequently receiving dual-purpose rubber at both ends.

Having massaged the subframe to accommodate a bespoke seat pan, the Analog squad reached out to regular collaborator Dane Utech for the upholstery. Green’s rear-end anatomy is completed by LED lighting, SW-Motech saddlebags, and a new fender that’s been manufactured in-house.

Up north, you’ll find a state-of-the-art Denali M7 headlamp and Motogadget turn signals, as well as a fresh handlebar from Moose Racing. The latter wears knurled grips, a Magura HC1 brake master cylinder, and an underslung BikeMaster mirror fitted on the left-hand side. We see a retro-style Koso gauge rounding things out in the cockpit, while the paint job comes courtesy of Waukesha-based Artistimo Custom Design.

 
 
 
 
 

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