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Canada Will Ban New ICE Passengers Cars and Light Trucks From Sale in 2035

September 15, 2015, was a regular day for countless people out there, but the Dieselgate scandal made it a watershed moment in hindsight. The Volkswagen emission scandal paved the way for all-electric vehicles to the detriment of fossil-fuel vehicles, and Norway stands out from every other country for its 2025 deadline for the sales ban on new combustion vehicles.
Dodge Super Stock 35 photos
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From your typical econobox (the Ford Fiesta comes to mind) to luxobarges and mid-size pickup trucks, the Nordic kingdom is prepared to ban them all unless automakers make the switch to all-electric propulsion. Canada originally intended to enact a similar policy in 2040, but the Minister of Transport, the honorable Omar Alghabra, accelerated the deadline to 2035.

His reasoning is rather simple. You could even say it’s ridiculously simple because two reasons were offered in total. For starters, Transport Canada intends to cut pollution from all sectors of the economy, although most greenhouse emissions come courtesy of a sector that’s not related to transportation. I’m referring to oil and gas, which contributes to 10 percent of the country’s annual gross domestic product. Transportation, meanwhile, is the second biggest generator of greenhouse emissions in Canada.

The second reason is a prosperous net-zero emissions economy by 2050, which is downright laughable given that we’re 29 years away from 2050 and Canadian lawmakers still have a lot to do to make that goal attainable.

“Only bold climate policies lead to bold results,” said Alghabra. “Through measures aimed at accelerating the transition to zero-emission vehicles sales, we’ll continue building a cleaner and more resilient economy, while also creating good jobs and opportunities for all Canadians. We will also continue to support the automotive sector, including through an investment to accelerate the industrial transition thanks to the Net Zero Accelerator.”



Editor's note: Dodge Super Stock pictured in the gallery

 
 
 
 
 

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