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2022 Toyota Tundra Owner Isn’t Amused by the Build Quality of His New Truck

Adam George picked up his 2022 Toyota Tundra SR5 TRD Sport for MSRP on December 18th last year. Equipped with the Advanced Technology Package, Premium Audio Package, Panoramic View Monitor, and blind spot-indicating mirrors, the green-painted truck sure is a looker.
2022 Toyota Tundra quality issue 14 photos
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Optioned with the 5.5-foot bed and crew cab, the full-size pickup is worth almost $60,000, including destination charge. Initially pleased by his truck, the owner reported on December 30th via a Facebook group: “I’m disappointed with the fit & finish. Every time I look it over closely, I found more components that probably are on the edge of being in tolerance.” Yikes!

Adam refers to weather stripping on the rear passenger window that’s not seated properly, a tremendous gap between the right and middle section of the rear bumper, and a slightly misaligned body panel. Later on, the owner found a few more issues that are pretty distasteful for a Toyota.

The one-month ownership update includes a rear seat that doesn’t latch down after Adam lifted it to access the storage area, a windshield that may not be sealed properly in one spot due to the wind noise that enters the cabin, a rear-seat seatbelt detector that goes off despite nobody sitting back there, a slight play in the steering wheel, and steering wheel controls that pop out of place. Worse still, the auto-braking system has activated a few times driving down an incline, most probably mistaking it for a wall.

A diehard Toyota loyalist with three 4Runners and a Tundra under his belt, Adam’s plan was to keep his all-new Tundra for a few years. But given the aforementioned issues, “I will be likely looking to trade in on it.”

Adam is currently interested in a 2020 to 2021 TRD Pro, which is only available with a free-breathing V8 engine as opposed to the current generation’s twin-turbo V6 powertrains. On that note, Adam is encouraging fellow Tundra enthusiasts to wait until Toyota fixes these build quality-related kinks before putting a deposit down on the all-new Tundra.

 
 
 
 
 

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