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1970 AMC AMX Parked for 40 Years Is a Big Bad Blue Time Capsule

Introduced in 1970, the AMC AMX is often viewed as yet another one of American Motors Corporation's attempts to compete with muscle cars of the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro, and Plymouth Barracuda variety. But the AMX was a two-seater, so it was actually aimed at the Corvette.
1970 AMC AMX warehouse find 17 photos
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Granted, it wasn't as successful as AMC had hoped and it was discontinued after only three years in showrooms, but the AMX is slowly becoming a sought-after collectible. And like many short-lived performance cars from the era, it's quite rare in certain trim and color combinations. The Big Bad Blue example you see here is one of those cars.

One of only 114 examples finished in this hue and fitted with the 360-cubic-inch (5.9-liter) V8 and automatic transmission, this AMC AMX spent a whopping 40 years in a warehouse. But it's not a derelict barn find in need of restoration. It's one of those unrestored and highly original gems that took long-term storage like a champ.

Yes, it shows a few dings and dents and it has a few rust spots here and there, but it hasn't been patched up. The seller says the "mostly original" paint has been clear-coated, while the underside is surprisingly clean for a vehicle that's 52 years old as of 2022.

The interior is in even better shape, with no cracks in the dash and the upholstery, and still fitted with the original "AMX" floor mats.

The good news continued under the hood in the form of a numbers-matching V8 that has been rebuilt. A one-year-only mill in the AMX, the 360 four-barrel was rated at 285 horsepower when new. While not as potent as the 325-horsepower 390-cubic-inch (6.4-liter) alternative, it was powerful enough to push the coupe down the quarter-mile in less than 15 seconds.

The engine is not the only component that's been upgraded, though. This AMX also runs on an all-new front suspension and features new drum brakes and lines at all four corners. The owner also installed a new fuel tank, a mandatory swap for a classic that sat for 40 years.

The car also comes with a long list of other new and restored components, including a set of wheels, "Ram Air" parts, spare tire parts, jack, and valve covers. The odometer on this thing reads 62,300 miles (100,262 km).

Located in Westerville, Ohio, the 1970 AMX is being auctioned off by eBay seller "toymastermick." The ad has gotten a lot of attention so far, with 46 bids raising the price to $25,100. The reserve hasn't been met with more than a couple of days left to go. How much do you think this AMX is worth?

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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