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Porsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Drag Race Needs a Lot of Adjustments

Make no mistake about it: the Audi RS 3 Sportback is a very quick car. In its highly contested segment of super hot hatches, it's second only to the Mercedes-AMG A 45, and if you know anything about that model, you also know there's no shame in taking the runner-up spot.
Porsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag race 8 photos
Porsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag racePorsche 911 Turbo Vs Audi RS 3 Sportback drag race
However, completely stock, the base Audi RS model is absolutely no match for the Porsche 911 Turbo. As far as the Neunelfer is concerned, it's a simple case of "anything you can do I can do better." Power? 572 hp (600 PS) Vs 395 hp (400 PS). Torque? 553 lb-ft (750 Nm) Vs. 354 lb-ft (480 Nm). AWD? Check and check. Transmission? Eight-speed PDK Vs seven-speed S-Tronic. Aerodynamic shape? Sporty coupe Vs family-friendly hatchback. What else?

The only way the Audi could win this race is if they kept going down the track until the Porsche ran out of gas. However, the guys at YouTube channel Motor have a much better idea: how about staggering the standing start to give the Audi a fighting chance?

You could use physics and, based on the manufacturer's official numbers, come up with the exact gap needed to make the two cars cross the line at the same time. However, there are two problems with that: one, those numbers have nothing to do with the reality of a wet track on a winter's day in Australia, and two, you probably don't know the formula to calculate that anyway.

Besides, where would the fun be in that? Guesstimating is a much more entertaining way of doing it, so it's precisely what the two hosts go for. They start with a relatively conservative distance of 40 meters (about 131 feet), though the drone shot suggests to us it may be less than that. Anyway, 40 meters or less, it was clearly not enough.

Time to put the two cars further apart: 60 meters (~197 feet). Considering the finish line sits at 400 meters (~1,312 feet, though you could round it off to 1,320), that's a huge chunk of the race the Audi gets to skip. The guys admit they don't have any precise measuring devices, so the numbers are orientational at best. Is this greater distance of unknown real value enough to make the finish any less obvious? Nope, it's not.

They move on to 70 meters (230 feet), and it feels as though they've hit the sweet spot. Funnily enough (not for the Audi or its driver, though), the Porsche still wins it, but it's the definition of a photo finish. So, there you have it: if you're in a Porsche 911 Turbo and you want to catch an Audi RS 3, as long as it's 70 meters or closer when you both set off, you'll get in front within 400 meters. We can't see any practical application for this information, but you can never know.

Not contempt with the humiliation they had already subjected the RS 3 Sportback to, the guys decide a 30 mph (50 km/h) rolling race was also in order. With no massive head start - or any head start, for that matter - you can imagine how that went down.



 
 
 
 
 

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