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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast Lap

I'm done attending static car meets. Sure, it's nice to look at modded vehicles up close. But it's even better seeing them stretching their legs at the racetrack. There's nothing like standing 30 feet away from a 150 mph (241 kph) acceleration zone.
Porsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast Lap 13 photos
Photo: Collecting Cars
Porsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast LapPorsche 911 GT3 RS Boldly Challenges a McLaren 750S to a Fast Lap
I've watched a lot of automotive content on YouTube since I first signed up on the platform in 2006. I still have my old playlists from the day, divided into Drifting, Wangan, Touge, and Motorcycles. Ken Block revolutionized the industry with his first Gymkhana video, and many have tried to copy him over the years. I was part of a team that shot and edited pro drifting events.

And action-focused montages with dubstep music were all the hype some ten years ago. But these days, the world tends to consume much shorter content. Versus videos work well, so there has been a rise in drag racing challenges between road-going vehicles. It can be fun for the first few times, but those become tedious. Pitching two supercars in a head-to-head battle down a straight line is ultimately meaningless, especially if you can afford to buy any of the two.

At that point, you're better off searching for more detailed analyses. That's where time attack comes in. Using the same driver for two cars may point out more differences. Tests like these could aid you in deciding which one is better for you before going on an actual test drive. I've admired Chris Harris for almost a decade now, ever since his F50 vs F40 comparison test.

It takes a particular set of skills and braveness to slide around in a car worth well over $1 million. And I'm happy to see that he's still at it these days. I'm jealous but excited to see what his take is. The Porsche 911 GT3 RS is one of the most formidable driver cars money can buy today. I've seen hours of footage featuring this vehicle on some of the world's most famous racetracks, and I'd jump at the opportunity to drive it.

Its naturally aspirated, 4.0-liter flat-six engine has a maximum output of 518 hp and 343 lb-ft (465 Nm) of torque. With a rear-mounted engine, rear-wheel drive, and a weight of 3,196 lbs (1,450 kg), this thing is a beast by any definition. But there's more to it than its engine output. With that big wing on the back and a cleverly designed aero package, the GT3 RS generates 1,896 lbs (860 kg) of downforce at 177 mph (285 kph).

That is, and I'm quoting here: "twice as much downforce as its most recent (991 II) predecessor and three times as much as a current 911 GT3." Going up against McLaren's 750S will be challenging. The V8-powered supercar is slightly lighter but has much more power to play with. The 0.9-mile (1.45 km) long layout at Llandow Circuit won't provide enough room for the GT3 RS to flex its downforce capabilities. I won't spoil the outcome for you, but I can't help but wonder whether the test would have ended differently at Spa Francorchamps.

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About the author: Dragos Chitulescu
Dragos Chitulescu profile photo

The things Dragos enjoys the most in life are, in no particular order: cars, motorcycles, diecast cars, and drifting. He's seen (and driven) many vehicles since he started his writing career back in 2009, but his garage currently houses a 1991 Mazda RX-7 FC3S Turbo II and a 1999 Suzuki SV650-S.
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