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Modified Ducati Monster 750 Improves Upon the Stock Package in Every Way

To call Revival Cycles of Austin, Texas a custom bike shop wouldn’t do it justice, because the firm is more of an outright mecca for customization. It requires no introduction to those who are familiarized with the scene, having garnered attention far and wide since it was founded in 2008. Oh, and of course, Revival’s bike-modding connoisseurs are the masterminds behind the famed Handbuilt Motorcycle Show.
Modified Ducati Monster 750 31 photos
Photo: Revival Cycles
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Their track record is a pretty impressive one to say the least, and many of the older projects they worked on are still worth looking at today. Case in point, the restyled Ducati Monster shown above was put together back in 2020, with relatively minor tweaks by Revival’s standards. It may not be as complex as some of their other builds, but this doesn’t mean that it won’t deserve a close inspection.

On the contrary, what you’re seeing here is a great example of how restraint and a less-is-more design approach can really work wonders. The bike belongs to a guy named Joe Ramos, who’d already indulged in some tasty modifications prior to his collaboration with Revival Cycles. For starters, a Monster 750 from 1999 could certainly use a few upgrades to its running gear, and Joe’s exemplar was no different.

It was therefore treated to all the front-end equipment of a 2006 Ducati SportClassic, including its upside-down forks, beefier Brembo brakes, and front fender. Moreover, the laced aluminum wheels were taken from the same SportClassic and wrapped in grippy MT90 rubber on both ends. Hailing from Pirelli’s catalog, the tires measure 120/70 up north and 160/70 down south.

Joe did away with the Monster’s standard monoshock, as well, installing an adjustable Ohlins substitute in its stead. All these modifications are sure to make his ride handle a lot better, but some cosmetic changes were also on the menu. The Duc’s owner had its frame powder-coated gold, then he added a pair of CNC-machined rearsets to replace the chunkier stock parts.

Modified Ducati Monster 750
Photo: Revival Cycles
Needing some help with the electronics and saddle upholstery, this is where Joe handed things over to the experts at Revival. At first, he planned on continuing the project himself once these aspects were taken care of, but he ultimately stuck with the Austin-based workshop until the very end. The crew started by revising the fuel tank’s underside, so as to make room for storing the motorcycle’s electrical hardware.

They had everything rewired through a Motogadget controller with Bluetooth connectivity, while also adding an Antigravity eight-cell battery and a Rick’s regulator/rectifier. Moving on to the cockpit area, Revival fitted an LSL handlebar on new risers, which are in turn attached to a Ducati Hypermotard’s top clamp. The handlebar features an array of premium aftermarket goodies, such as tiny Motogadget switches, bar-end turn signals, and ASV control levers.

Brembo supplied the clutch and brake master cylinders, while the bike’s instrumentation comes in the form of a Chronoclassic tachometer from Motogadget’s range. Rounding out the cockpit paraphernalia is a Domino throttle and a single underslung mirror mounted on the left. Further ahead, we come across a 5.75-inch LED headlamp from United Pacific Industries, secured in place via a handmade stainless-steel bracket.

Modified Ducati Monster 750
Photo: Revival Cycles
Once the Monster’s front end was finished off, the guys turned their attention to the rear portion. The subframe remains pretty much unchanged, but it is now topped with a fresh seat pan featuring plentiful padding for comfort. Revival cloaked the seat in black leather upholstery stitched together in-house, while also adding an LED taillight with integrated blinkers at the rearmost tip. In addition, a compact license plate bracket can be spotted right beneath the latter.

Even though the donor’s 748cc L-twin engine is virtually stock on the inside, it did gain some new breathing equipment for improved airflow. A pair of rebuilt Keihin FCR flat-slide carbs have been placed on the intake side of things, and the OEM exhaust made room for Termignoni plumbing with high-mounted reverse megaphone silencers. These bad boys live on each side of their host’s subframe, leaving its rear wheel in full view unlike the factory setup.

Last but not least, Revival Cycles had to pick an appropriate colorway for the fuel tank and front fender, one that would complement the gold trellis frame nicely. After taking various options into consideration and getting Joe’s approval, they went with a Graphite Blue Metallic base from Porsche’s color palette. On the tank, it’s joined by retro-style Ducati logos done in gold.

We rarely see this much practical involvement from clients who commission a custom build, but Joe Ramos did a fantastic job on this particular occasion. With the help of Revival Cycles, his restyled Ducati Monster reached new heights from both a cosmetic and mechanical standpoint, all while keeping things relatively simple. The gold powder coating draws great attention to its gorgeous trellis frame, and everything else is a matter of restrained, yet purposeful mods.
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About the author: Silvian Secara
Silvian Secara profile photo

A bit of an artist himself, Silvian sees two- and four-wheeled machines as a form of art, especially restomods and custom rides. Oh, and if you come across a cafe racer article on our website, it’s most likely his doing.
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