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Jeremy Clarkson's Worst Car of 2020 Is the Aston Martin DBX

After summarizing his best-reviewed cars of 2020, The Sunday Times made a list of the five worst nameplates of the year, according to Jeremy Clarkson. In the first place – as in the worst – is a British utility vehicle produced by a company that has recently teetered on financial collapse.
Aston Martin DBX 41 photos
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The DBX may be the first-ever SUV from Aston Martin, but there are plenty of wrongs to highlight, starting with gear selection. Using buttons instead of a lever is unnecessarily cumbersome in Jeremy’s book, and I can’t agree more with him. “Botched plastic surgery” is how the 60-year-old journalist describes the leather stitching, but the biggest offender is the ride quality.

In his column for The Sunday Times, the tallest of the three amigos on The Grand Tour writes that “it literally wobbles on the motorway. If you try to sing in this thing to pass the time, you will get a very clear understanding of what’s meant by vibrato.” As for the things he likes about the DBX, the exterior design, and the fact that it’s endlessly customizable take the cake.

Next up, the BMW M8 Competition received a poor rating for a number of reasons that may leave you baffled. For starters, Jeremy Clarkson calls it too heavy and too powerful, which is pretty curious if you remember his “POWER!” shenanigans on Top Gear. The steering feel, drive-by-wire braking system, and brutal ride didn’t help the German interloper either.

The first affordable car on the list is the Kia XCeed, which received 2.5 out of a maximum of 5. Jezza makes a case about the underpowered engine, a 1.4-liter turbo with 138 HP, which is exacerbated by torque steer and axle tramp. “It felt as though I was driving along in the early 1980s,” he said.

The Hyundai i10 is the subject of a 1,153-word-long review, but of those, around 120 words are actually dedicated to the South Korean econobox. A bit harsh if you ask me, but then again, an A-segment city car with few things in the way of excitement definitely isn’t worthy of gratuitous praise.

Jeremy did pretty much the same thing with the Skoda Kamiq, the smallest crossover in the Czech automaker’s lineup. The biggest problem of the Kamiq is, of course, the Volkswagen Group for making it almost identical in every material way to the SEAT Arona and Volkswagen T-Cross.

Last but certainly not least, the honorable mention goes to the T-Roc Cabriolet. Clarkson was so unimpressed by the soft-topped SUV that he couldn’t spare more than a paragraph for it. Awful is the adjective he used to describe the design, and “the stubborn refusal to accelerate meant that I turned around, went home, and did farming instead.”

 

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