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Iconic 1981 Honda CBX With Uncharted Mileage Is Enigmatically Intriguing and Up for Grabs

When it comes to sound, few machines can rival the mighty six-cylinder choir of a CBX.
1981 Honda CBX 32 photos
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As you admire the pristine 1981 Honda CBX displayed in these photos, you’ll notice that it sports an assortment of aftermarket bits and pieces installed under previous ownership. Among these goodies, we find a two-up Corbin saddle with red highlights, six-into-two Kerker exhaust plumbing and a new fork brace.

This CBX had been introduced to its current owner in 2020, and it was subsequently fitted with Shinko Tour Master tires and modern spark plugs. Further powertrain maintenance consisted of refurbishing the carbs and adjusting the valves, while the engine covers have been refinished to bring about an ultra-clean appearance.

Moreover, the specimen’s fueling system was rebuilt using a fresher petcock, youthful lines and a premium filter. Honda’s sport-touring icon is brought to life by a beastly 1,047cc inline-six mill featuring 24 valves and Keihin carburetion technology. Paired with a five-speed gearbox, the air-cooled DOHC goliath is able to supply 98 crank-measured ponies when the bike’s tachometer counts 9,000 rpm.

At a lower point down the rev range, this bad boy will go about delivering 63 pound-feet (85 Nm) of feral twist towards the rear chain-spun Comstar hoop. Before culminating in a top speed of 135 mph (217 kph), the engine’s oomph can launch the CBX to 60 mph (96 kph) from a standstill in 4.6 seconds.

Suspension duties are assigned to air-adjustable telescopic forks at the front, along with a single shock absorber and an aluminum Pro-Link swingarm at the rear. Braking is achieved through the use of dual 276 mm (10.9 inches) vented rotors up north and a single 296 mm (11.7 inches) disc on the other end.

The collectible Japanese relic we’ve just looked at is currently heading to auction with unknown mileage, and you may place your bids at no reserve on Bring a Trailer until Sunday, June 26. At the moment, the top bidder is offering just under $7,000 in the hope of securing this purchase, but we reckon that sum won’t be staying in the lead for much longer.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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