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Harley-Davidson 750 Stealth Adventure Bike Breaks Cover in Thailand

It looks like someone has finally been daring enough to rip right through the prejudices and try their hand at bringing together two ideas that seem almost irreconcilable, Harley-Davidson and adventure bikes. Enter the Harley-Davidson 750 Stealth adventure custom machine, a creation that spells both "cool" and "controversy."
Harley-Davidson 750 Stealth adventure bike 12 photos
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The 750 Stealth hails from Thailand and is the brainchild of Richy Wilson, the CEO of Richco Harley-Davidson, in Chiang Mai. We don't have enough info right now on whether Richy simply wanted to push limits or give Harley a heads-up, but his take on the Milwaukee's second-smallest cruiser looks indeed like a potential game-changer.

As you expected, there is little left from the H-D machine, save from the engine and few other parts. Naturally, the rest had to go because the bike was supposed to receive an all-new life, largely incompatible with that of a cruiser. And looking at photos of a Street 750 and the 750 Stealth could not be more eloquent.

The H-D 750 Stealth looks radically different from the donor machine, and that's because it's a radically different motorcycle, The front end was changed entirely, receiving a full-fledged motocross fork, a no-nonsense wire-spoked 21" wheel and aggressive knobby Dunlop tires.

In the rear, the Street 750 rim was replaced by an 18" one with a chain drive. A monoshock replaced the iconic dual suspensions in the back, further reducing the weight and adding solid terrain-tracking capabilities, while the swingarm is also a custom unit fabricated to accommodate the new suspension.

The entire fairing was made from hand-formed alloy, and this includes the fuel tank. The bike's front retains a strong R1200GS resemblance, whereas the midship harks back to the KTM 1190 and 1290. LED headlights, custom exhausts, apparently new bars, and a touring-ready luggage system are also part of this rather intriguing build.

It's hard to say how a cruiser engine will behave off the road, but it's definitely worth a very serious try. As Harley-Davidson is considering going adv, we'd rather say this is only because the 1st of April is drawing near.



 
 
 
 
 

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