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C8 Chevrolet Corvette Has Stop Delivery Order Related to Flying Frunk Recall

Chevrolet made the headlines in an incredibly positive way with its C8 Corvette switching to a completely new mid-engine architecture. But fans of the model have been taking hit after hit ever since – the global health crisis meant most of their orders were postponed or at least delivered late. And then in June we found out about a possible mechanical issue related to the new front trunk (aka frunk) that turned in July into a related recall and now in August into a stop delivery order.
2020 Chevrolet Corvette 122 photos
2020 Chevrolet CorvetteC8 Corvette recall software updateC8 Corvette recall software updateC8 Corvette recall software updateC8 Corvette recall software updateC8 Corvette recall software update
Chevy’s flying frunk woes started with user complaints on the NHTSA website about the hood popping open and obscuring visibility while driving – a major hazard. Fortunately, no one was injured, and it seems General Motors quickly started an investigation on the matter.

Then, in July, the company acknowledged there was an issue with the newly designed front trunk – although it was a related problem, not the one some users were signaling. The American automaker said it discovered a serious safety concern related to the mandatory interior trunk release safeguard.

Cue to the month of August and, finally, Chevrolet is just about ready to also resolve the flying frunk hood hazard. Accent on just about ready because GM recall N202311160 is at the moment incomplete as the remedy is not yet available.

And this means that according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) guidance they also must stop the deliveries of the affected units both in new and used inventory until the fix can be completed on all affected units.

In the recall description the carmaker explains that certain 2020 model year Chevrolet Corvette units have a defect that endangers the vehicle’s safety if drivers do not see / hear or choose to ignore the car’s warnings that its front trunk lid is open.

In our book this is certainly a neat way of assigning the blame on the owners, actually.

Still, the company at least acknowledges that in that situation the vehicle can still be driven at speed and the wind force might be enough to flip the frunk hood open. GM wants to resolve the issue by limiting the top speed with the front trunk lid open to 26 mph and changing the software to supply new warnings as well as to require longer presses for the corresponding remote release buttons on the car key and interior switch.



 
 
 
 
 

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