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Artemis SLS Rocket “On the Path to the Pad” As Flight Software Meets Computer

It’s been a very long journey for the Space Launch System rocket, the system that is supposed to get humans back to the Moon for the first time in half a century, but all the bits and pieces are beginning to come together. And now, after seeing for months how the thing is being assembled at the Kennedy Space Center, we’re getting word of more delicate systems becoming ready.
Space Launch System 9 photos
NASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boosters
The SLS is currently in the process of being stacked inside NASA’s facilities in Florida. On August 6, for the first time since these operations began, the rocket’s core stage, which contains the flight computers, was powered up. Three days later, crews began installing the flight software.

That would be the extremely important software that will guide the rocket during launch and ascent to space, taking care of steering, flight, tracking, and guidance for the behemoth. Developed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the system is now undergoing final checkouts and tests before receiving certification for the mission.

This development made SLS’ systems engineering and integration manager David Beaman confident enough to state this week that the massive rocket is “on the path to the pad,” turning up the world’s anticipation levels for the launch.

The software now being put through its paces will be in charge with controlling two solid rocket boosters and four RS-25 engines that develop a staggering 8.8 million pounds of thrust. Three computers will share duties during launch.

The first real test for the SLS rocket and Orion capsule assembly is called Artemis I. For safety reasons, that would be an uncrewed mission that will take off at an unspecified date later this year, with the rocket accelerating the capsule fast enough for it to reach the Moon, circle it, and then head back to Earth.

If all goes well, Artemis II will do the same, only this time with humans on board, who will not be landing on the Moon. It’s Artemis III which will be responsible for placing American boots (one pair shielding the feet of a woman) on our planet’s satellite.

press release
 

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