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Humans Look Like Ants Next to NASA's Newly-Assembled SLS 'Megarocket'

NASA released photos of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket coming together at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This 'megarocket', which will stand taller than the Statue of Liberty, is getting closer to its first uncrewed flight.
NASA's SLS core stage was successfully lowered down in between already assembled twin solid rocket boosters 9 photos
NASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boostersNASA's team lifting the 212-foot-tall SLS rocket's core stage and its four RS-25 engines to the mobile launcher to place it in between smaller boosters
SLS is a super-heavy-lift launch vehicle that sets the foundation for human exploration beyond Earth's orbit. Providing massive power, it's the only rocket that can send astronauts, cargo, and the Orion space capsule to the Moon on a single mission. The first SLS vehicle, called Block 1, can send more than 59,500 pounds (29 tons) to orbits beyond the Moon and provide the power to help Orion reach an astonishing speed of 24,500 mph (39,429 kph).

It will serve as the primary launch vehicle for NASA's deep space exploration missions, including the Artemis program's planned lunar flights and a possible human journey to Mars. The Artemis I mission will be the first in a series of increasingly complex missions aimed at re-establishing human presence on the Moon.

However, before it embarks on its space journey, the rocket needs to be assembled first here, on Earth. That's what NASA has shown us recently. The rocket was assembled on Friday, June 11th, at Florida's Kennedy Space Center. The engineers with Exploration Ground Systems lifted the 212-foot (64.6 meters) core module and placed it in between smaller booster rockets.

As SLS is getting ready to takeoff later this year, there are still many steps and tests that need to be done. Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, crews will finish outfitting and other crucial assembly work before Artemis I rolls out to the launch pad.

The final configuration will stand 322 feet (98 meters) tall and weigh 5.75 million lbs (2,608 metric tons). That's bigger than the Statue of Liberty. SLS will also produce 8.8 million lbs (3,992 metric tons) of maximum thrust.

Artemis I is set to take place on November 22nd this year. Once above Earth, the rocket will officially kickstart the Artemis space program, which will see its first crewed lunar landing mission in 2024.




 
 
 
 
 

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