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2016 Mazda MX-5 Tuned by Kuhl Racing Looks Riced

We say that the all-new Miata has a lot in common with the first one, forgetting all the weird tuning projects that were around in the 1990s. The memories came flooding in today when we laid eyes on the Kuhl Racing version of the 2016 MX-5, revealed at the 2016 Tokyo Auto Salon.
2016 Mazda MX-5 Tuned By Kuhl Racing 25 photos
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The all-new Mazda MX-5 is a throwback to the classic two-seater sportscars of the 1970s. Cars like the Triumph Spitfire, the Lotus Elan and the MGB didn't shout about their high-performance 7-liter engines... because they didn't have any.

That's also somewhat true when it comes to the 2016 Mazda MX-5, which is available with two engines. Americans know only about the 2.0-liter and think it's slow, but the Japanse can only buy a 1.5-liter. We drove it last year, and while it puts a giant grin on your face, there's no chance of keeping up with even a Fiesta ST.

The Japanese are used to small engines and strict speed limits. To compensate, they like to express themselves through body kits and strange wheels.

It's hard to be kind to this thing, but we'll try our best. The changes come in fast and extremely aggressively, starting with the new front bumper. Four large vertical blades probably create more drag than downforce. But, at least you won't lose your car in a parking lot.

The gaping grille shouts out that this car wants attention, like the bling-bling teeth of a rapper. We then notice the aero side skirts and a rear bumper with an integrated diffuser. The same Japanese tuning company also offers a cheap set of LED rear lights, a swan neck GT wing that you can purchase for around $900 and some other trinkets.

If you're in the market for sports exhaust to make your 1.5-liter engine sound riced, know that Kuhl's "Slash 2" system can be yours for $1,000. It's made from 100mm steel piping and is nicely finished off with twin centrally mounted tips with a Heat Blue treatment added for good measure.

Things wouldn't be so bad if it weren't for the weird camber on the rear wheels and a suspension system that looks like it's got broken springs. But hey, you can't make a cool Japanese car without breaking somebody's back!

 
 
 
 
 

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