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1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner Is Retractable Top Gem, Comes With Searchlights

As one of the largest carmakers out there, Ford has a very long list of cars to its name. The present lineup in the U.S. comprises close to 30 monikers, ranging from the iconic Mustang to the useful Transit. The list of nameplates that have been scrapped is even longer and includes both long-dead models we still get to see in large numbers on the open market and rarer ones, like the Fairlane.
1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner 18 photos
1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner
The Fairlane was introduced in 1955 and was around for some 15 years. It mutated from a full-sized machine to mid-size during its life, and helped put Ford back over Chevrolet in terms of sales for the first time since 1935. This happened in 1957, the year this particular Fairlane comes from.

1957 was the year when the Fairlane family got expanded to include the Skyliner. That was the moniker the Blue Oval used to describe the retractable hardtop offering in the range, and because of the way it worked (the solid roof folded into the very long trunk, and all you needed to do to make that happen was push a button), it proved to be an instant hit among customers.

You’re looking at a restored Fairlane Skyliner from 1957, one that looks extremely fresh thanks to some restoration work done not long ago. The car retains most of the original hardware and fittings, down to the extremely complex mechanism that allowed the roof to be taken out of the way.

Powered by a restored 292-ci (4.8-liter) Thunderbird engine worked through a 3-speed automatic transmission and a 9-inch rear, the car comes with 66,000 miles (106,000 km) on the odometer and a price tag to match the ambitions of a classic car with modern aspirations: $63,500.

As a side note, for that money, the buyer also gets the two searchlights mounted on each side of the hood, because you never know what you might lose in the dark.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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