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1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements, 9,000 RPM Engine

Sacrilege - there’s always such a fine line between heavy words such as this one and projects that like to step out of the comfort zone. To our eyes, all the builds that fall into the second category are worthy of sharing with you. So here we are, talking about a hot rod with an F1 twist.
1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements 12 photos
Photo: http://www.kromphoto.com/
1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements1930s Ford Model A Hot Rod Has F1 Aero Elements
The contraption you see here started out life as a 1930s five-window Ford Model A, but it has entered a reinvention process starting this spring. The kind that has turned into a compact beast with a trolling twist we love.

No, this is not a rendering, but the thing was based on one. You are looking at a real car that mixes the hot rod aura with a Grand Prix twist.

From the side air “intakes” and the hood-mounted air scoop to that massive wing and the rear diffuser, there are plenty of elements here that shout “Formula One!”

As for the technical side of the four-wheeled creature, we can tell you the front suspension uses a cantilever setup, not unusual for this kind of build. At the rear, we find a setup borrowed from the Honda S2000.

What else can you use when the engine under that retro nose comes from an S2k? And when your powerplant can rev to 9,000 rpm, you’ll want to be aware of it, which is why the S2000’s digital instrument cluster now adorns the cabin. In another F1 nod, this sits in the middle of the dashboard.

While no serious driving footage has surfaced yet, it’s not hard to imagine the driver thrashing those slicks in the rain, maybe as a ritual for bringing Honda back on track in Formula One. Still, we have to thank BrainDead Media for the videos and pics of the project.

The owner, James Schwarts, is the kind of young rebel that couldn’t care less for rules such as those stating one doesn’t mix the styles seen here. You don’t tell a guy who used to drive an all-custom Rocket Bunny Scion FR-S what to do.

The project is called Great Depression, and given the origins of the car, it’s not difficult to understand why.

James seems to have had his share of personal issues. Then again, haven’t we all? For one thing, perhaps this is why Nick Cave was chosen for the soundtrack.

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About the author: Andrei Tutu
Andrei Tutu profile photo

In his quest to bring you the most impressive automotive creations, Andrei relies on learning as a superpower. There's quite a bit of room in the garage that is this aficionado's heart, so factory-condition classics and widebody contraptions with turbos poking through the hood can peacefully coexist.
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