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Watch This Russian Mechanic Fix a BMW 7 Series by Welding on a New Back End

The thing about BMWs is that they are always desirable, even as second-hand cars with a quarter of a million miles on the clock. But would you buy one if you knew that the whole back end has been welded on after a serious accident? A dealership shop would never even attempt such a thing.
Watch This Russian Mechanic Fix a BMW 7 Series by Welding on a New Back End 4 photos
Watch This Russian Mechanic Fix a BMW 7 Series by Welding on a New Back EndWatch This Russian Mechanic Fix a BMW 7 Series by Welding on a New Back EndWatch This Russian Mechanic Fix a BMW 7 Series by Welding on a New Back End
Annoying old people love to buy crappy new cars like Dacia and Kias. Meanwhile, their 20-something kids work day and night to afford something that's cool and can drift.

The only problem with buying a second-hand drift car is that there's a good chance some spirited driver crashed it before. Such appears to be the case with this otherwise lovely black-on-black BMW 7 Series.

It's taken a massive shunt up the back, probably as a result of a high-speed crash. Technically, this is a write-off, but this Russian mechanic fixes it to the point where you wouldn't know.

I've watched a few of his other videos and saw that the mechanic even has laser tech to match the original geometry of the car. So technically, he is executing correctly something which should never be done.

With most of the trim and carpet removed, he goes about cutting the rear part of the car, taking the angle grinder to the D-pillars and the floor. And where does the donor rear end come from? We can only presume that it's from anther crashed 7 Series that's missing its front end.

A skilled technician might be able to find some of the welds, but only if the owner knew there was something wrong with the car. The obvious cuts in the door wells and roof pillars are too cleverly hidden.

Could you imagine what would happen if one of these improvised welds were to crack at 200 km/h, which the 7 Series is easily capable of doing? Remember, this is a rear-wheel drive car, so the axle from the engine is constantly trying to twist the body back there.

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