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GMC Granite Trademarked with US Patent Office

At the Detroit Auto Show in 2010, GMC introduced the Granite Concept to the world. Fast-forward more than five years since then and General Motors (re)applies with the US Patent and Trademark Office for the GMC Granite trademark. Should we be expecting an all-new model from the company?
GMC Granite Concept 16 photos
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As the peeps from LeftLaneNews pointed out in their story, production plans fluctuated between “Okay, we will do something new for GMC,” and “Nah, scrap it.” Mark Reuss added to the speculation by talking about an “innovative portfolio entry” that would slot below the GMC Terrain, but nothing has materialized so far.

Then there’s the mystery of what kind of vehicle the GMC Granite will be if it were to be approved for production. A compact model as the concept car or a diminutive pickup truck like the GMC Granite CPU Concept that debuted at the 2010 LA Auto Show?

In any case, let’s not get ahead of the game and turn simple speculation into a glimmer of hope. We’re only talking about a manufacturer that (re)applied a trademark with the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Back in 2010, GMC product marketing director Lisa Hutchinson declared: “[the] Granite was conceived as a new type of vehicle from GMC – one that could stretch people’s ideas of what a GMC can be.”

Lisa also labeled the Granite “urban utility vehicle (UUV)” because the “goal was redefining what the GMC name could mean to a new generation of customers looking for both bold design and functionality.”

Last but not least, the press release of the Granite Concept reads: “If brought to market, the Granite would be the smallest GMC ever." Compared to the Terrain compact crossover, the concept vehicle is 2 feet (0.6 m) shorter. Whether it will enter production sometime in the future, only time (and the rumor mill) will tell.

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