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Communist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan from the Shah of Iran Is on Sale

In 1962, the Iranian national auto maker would sell their first locally-produced car, named Paikan. Created under Hillman license, the car would slowly turn into a national emblem thus a rightful gift the Shah of Iran would give Romania’s communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, in 1974. The present was a friendly gesture done by the Iranian leader as the Communist ruler would convert his post of president of the State Council to a full-fledged executive presidency that year.
Communist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan Is on Sale, It Was a Gift from Iran 8 photos
Communist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan Is on Sale, It Was a Gift from IranHouse of Parliament, Nicolae Ceausescu's former Palace and the second biggest building in the worldMohammad Reza PahlaviNicolae CeausescuCommunist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan Is on Sale, It Was a Gift from IranCommunist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan Is on Sale, It Was a Gift from IranCommunist Dictator Nicole Ceausescu’s Paykan Is on Sale, It Was a Gift from Iran
The car is currently on auction at Artmark, a private Romanian auction house located in Bucharest, the capital city. With a starting price of EUR 4,000 ($4,934) the car was part of Nicolae Ceausescu’s personal collection and comes with a millage of only 2,000 km (1,200 miles). It's equipped with a 1.5-liter, 54 horsepower engine, that is capable of taking this piece of history to a maximum speed of 145 km/h (90 mph).

But as you probably realized already just by simply taking a peak at the picture, it’s not really the looks, nor is it the performance that impress. But rather what this car stands for. And let us expand.

In case you haven't checked any history book recently, we’ll take the time to remind you that Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was the last Shah of Iran. He came to power during World War II after an Anglo-Soviet invasion forced the abdication of his father, Reza Shah. As a ruler, he introduced the White Revolution, which was a series of economic, social and political reforms with the proclaimed intention of turning Iran into a global power. He is often called “the last Shah of Iran” or more commonly and simply “the Shah”.

It was during his ruling the national auto industry would bloom and the Paykan car would slowly become a national emblem. The two leaders were already in good relationships ever since Nicolae Ceausescu took power, in 1966, and opened the country’s economical relations with the Middle East country. So it was only natural for the Shah to try and impress his fellow ruler with the country’s best homemade product. Iran's pride
Paykan was an automobile produced by the Iranian company Iran National (later named Iran Khodro) Industrial Group. The car, often referred to as the Iranian “chariot”, was very popular in the country from the late 1960s to the late 1990s. The model was based on the 1967 Hillman Hunter, which was originally designed and manufactured by the British Rootes Group.

One year after Peugeot took over the Rootes company (it collapsed under the ownership of Chrysler Europe) in 1978, the Paykan’s engine production tooling was moved to Iran and was in full-scale manufacture under Peugeot license until 2005.

According to the auction house, the vehicle in question was preserved ever since it came into Romania and it will go under the hammer Tuesday, December 9, at Athenee Palace Hilton in Bucharest.

 
 
 
 
 

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