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Challenger Hellcat vs Nissan GT-R vs Porsche 911 Turbo S, a Worldwide Drag Race

Ever since Nissan introduced the R35 GT-R back in 2007, the Porsche 911 Turbo, be it an S or not, has constantly been targeted by the Japanese automaker. And while this means we're fully used to seeing Godzilla drag racing what is currently the most powerful Neunelfer derivative, when a Dodge Challenger Hellcat steps in, things become extra spicy.
Challenger Hellcat vs Nissan GT-R vs Porsche 911 Turbo S drag race 1 photo
And to make this three-way battle even more worthy of your attention, we have to mention the brawl takes place on European British soil, with the drag race being organized by autocar.

While the Challenger's rear-wheel-drive and shy rear tires (at least when compared to the rubber on the pair of supercars engaged in the race) meant the Mopar machine didn't stand a chance during the initial part of the race, the question is whether the blown 6.2-liter Hemi under the hood can allow the muscle car to catch up later in the race.
This is not about numbers, but we have to drop a few here
As for the GTR vs. Turbo S part of the velocity fight, we have to mention neither of the supercars is here in its most potent form. So, while this is a 552 hp (560 PS) 991 Turbo S, the 2015MY status of the Nissan GT-R means we're dealing with 542 hp (550 PS).

In a totally unrelated part of the story, we want to remind you of a recent drag race that also pitted a 550 PS GT-R against a 991-generation Neunelfer (here's the story). Nevertheless, instead of a representative of the Turbo badge, the Nissan battled it out with a GT3 RS.

In theory, the all-wheel-drive Nissan should've walked all over the 500 hp, naturally-aspirated Porsche. Well, things didn't quite go that way, which only comes to reinforce the conclusion that while Porsche is conservative about official times, Nissan uses the opposite approach.

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