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BMW K 75 Turned Into a Three-Wheeler Is a Collector’s Piece, Rolling Riddle

Who said you have to choose between driving a car or riding a motorcycle? There is always a middle way, as long as you don’t mind the extra attention and some form of compromise in comfort or performance: three-wheelers.
BMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new owner 14 photos
BMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new ownerBMW Modulo Car M89 built in 1997 is looking for a new owner
Back in the ‘90s, it was widely assumed that three-wheelers were the bright future. After all, they did promise to pack all the goods in one single package: the speed of a motorcycle and the comfort of a car, plus extra points for refusing to blend in with the crowd. These days, three-wheelers still exist but they’re more of novelty items than anything.

Say, for example, that a brand new Polaris Slingshot is not your cup of tea. You could always opt for a collector’s piece, like this here BMW bike / car that popped up for sale on Italian website AutoVergiate. This contraption, officially called BMW Modulo Car M89 is half car, half motorcycle and full-on awesomeness.

Built in 1997 in Italy, the Modulo uses the powertrain of a BMW K 75, so it’s technically still a motorcycle: a 740cc three-cylinder motorcycle that runs on gas. The K 75 was produced over 24 generations, between 1984 and 1995, so it’s somewhat safe to assume one of the most recent models was used for this build.

There is only one door for access inside the jet fighter-style cockpit and seating for two, in the same fighter jet manner. The exterior is painted in silver and blue, while the interior is black with red for the seatbelts.

The rear end of the Modulo is a motorcycle with just one wheel and dual exhaust, but from the front, it looks like a low sports car. It also features traditional car controls, with wheel, pedals and a gear shifter.

The ad notes that this is one of a very limited series of BMW Modulos, so it’s a genuine collector’s piece – priced accordingly, at €38,000 ($42,300).

It also has just 1,000 km (621 miles) on the clock, which should add to its overall desirability. The ad doesn’t say whether it’s road legal and doesn’t offer any additional details on what must be a fascinating background, but there’s this: it is listed as having had zero owners until the moment of sale. Which makes those miles on the clock a mystery of its own.

 
 
 
 
 

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