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Audi Admits Engine Management Irregularities in A6 and A7 Models

Confirming German media reports that a new improper software might have been used in some of its cars, Audi revealed on Tuesday that it found, during an internal investigation, irregularities in the engine-management software of V6 diesel engines fitted on A6 and A7 models.
A new emission issue reported by Audi 14 photos
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The models affected are part of the C7 generation, currently on the way out of the production process. The engines with the problem are Gen2 evo EU6 developing 200 kW.

Audi did not explicitly say what the software problem is. Earlier on Tuesday, media reports said software was used to slow down the use of the fluid to prevent drivers from refilling it between regular service updates. This, in turn, led to higher emission levels than officially stated.

Audi did not confirm rumors that said it ordered the stop of production of the new generation A6, which was introduced at the Geneva Motor Show, as some news outlets claimed.

There has been no information released as to who is responsible for the creation or the installation of the software that causes this problem. Further rounds of discussions with the registration authorities are planned in the coming weeks.

The carmaker has informed the Federal Motor Transport Authority in Germany and the vehicle registration authority in Luxembourg of the problem. Customers that have bought the affected models, some 60,000 of them, have been notified and will have to take the cars to the nearest dealer for software updates.

“We regularly inform the Federal Motor Transport Authority about the results of our systematic engine testing program,” said Rupert Stadler, Audi CEO.

“We report any irregularities to the authorities because full clarification is our top priority. We did so without delay also in this case.”

Of the 60,000 models with the problem, none are in the U.S., but half of cars have sold on global markets outside Germany.

 
 
 
 
 

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