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1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS Flexes a Chevelle SS Engine

A 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS in decent condition is something that we occasionally come across online, but here’s something that’s rather an unusual find.
1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS 25 photos
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Someone is selling a 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS with a Chevelle SS engine, and according to the listing, it “has never been run.”

The 396-ci (6.5-liter) engine is paired with a TH400 automatic transmission and develops 325 horsepower, though no other specifics have been provided, so we should probably assume everything is working correctly.

On the other hand, the Camaro does come with its weak points, and many of them are correctly highlighted in the pictures included in the gallery. While overall, it looks like a solid car, there still are some rust points, especially on the rear quarter openings, and interested buyers should look into them thoroughly.

The Camaro came equipped with disk brakes and air conditioning, and at first glance, it looks to be in a pretty fair condition. The owner says additional information would be provided via email.

One thing you should know, however, is the car was originally finished in Daytona yellow and featured black hockey stick stripes, only that someone decided to repaint it just the way you see it.

Back in 1969, Chevrolet built a little over 243,000 Camaros, out of which over 150,000 were base models. On the other hand, the RS accounted for more than 37,770 cars, while the SS badge could be seen on close to 35,000 units. Needless to say, the Z28 was the rarest of them all, with Chevrolet only building some 20,300 such Camaros.

The bad news is the auction for this Camaro is projected to come to an end later today, so if you’re interested in taking it home, you should really hurry up to submit your bid. At the time of writing, the highest bid is $11,100, though the reserve is yet to be met.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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