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Piecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo Session

We don't like to think about it, but most of the cars we love today will one day become worthless pieces of junk metal. Even the Mercedes-AMG GT could be made obsolete by autonomous battery-powered vehicles of the future. And if that day comes, we'll buy one and turn it into the Elysium GT-R rust rod.
Piecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo Session 16 photos
Piecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo SessionPiecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR Gets Sinister Photo Session
But for now, car junk is showing its beautiful side by becoming the background for a photo shoot with the Piecha Design Mercedes-AMG GT-RSR. We think it looks like a Mercedes interpretation of a Porsche 911 Turbo S, thanks to the exhaust, wing and wheel design. But let us know to what you'd compare Piecha's work in a comment.

It's been a couple of years since Piecha had a stand at the Essen Motor Show and they decided to bring this thing along, not before doing the photo shoot. This is old-fashioned Photoshop editing, the kind you used to have on your desktop and gazed at for hours.

Piecha is understandable proud of what's under the hood too. From 510 PS, the 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 has been boosted to 612 PS and 840 Nm (620 lb-ft) of torque.

Despite gaining over 100 ponies, they've only managed to shave 0.1 of a second off the 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) sprint time. But the Huracan-like output figure is backed up by the top speed of 205 mph (330 km/h).

“This is our masterpiece, and it is of a pioneering clarity and design," says Marcus Piecha, quite proud of his accomplishments.

Both the front and the rear of the car are completely customized. At the end that kills all the bugs, there are air winglets made from carbon fiber and other slight revisions. They used the same exotic material for the side skirts and the ultra-light carbon fiber diffuser that gets with an integrated reversing light.

Of course, we're fixated with the quad exhaust pipes. But probably the most important addition are the Yokohama Advan Sport tires, sized V105 275/35 ZR19 at the front and 305/30 ZR20 tires, where 13mm axle spacers have also been fitted.

 
 
 
 
 

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