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Yamaha Made A Patent For An Amphibious Car, Don't Get Your Hopes Up

Yamaha has filed a patent for the design of a two-seat amphibious vehicle. The idea behind it is a vehicle that tucks its wheels inside the body when traveling on water.
Yamaha's Amphibious Car patent 12 photos
Yamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patentYamaha's Amphibious Car patent
The filing was made in November 2014, but Yamaha’s creation was published on May 30, 2016. Since then, only the guys at AutoGuide discovered the unusual vehicle, so hats off to them for their observation and insight.

The source link for the Japanese Patent Office is no longer accessible, but unless you understand the language, it wouldn't make too much sense about the vehicle anyhow.

The idea is that the vehicle, which does not have a name, has wheels that can be concealed once it enters the water. There are even covers to hide the wheels once they are tucked in the body so that the craft will be faster than conventional models.

Yamaha already has a range of personal watercraft in its background, as well as a rich heritage in supplying engines for boats. Their line of motorcycles needs no introduction, but it is worth mentioning their acoustic expertise, as Yamaha also builds musical instruments.

At this point, it is relevant to note that Yamaha might not launch a production version of this vehicle any time soon.

If the Japanese brand considered manufacturing the model in series , it would have to resort to “borrowing” a platform from another one of its ranges. Since they already sell side-by-side land vehicles, as well as watercraft, Yamaha has the know-how required to build something durable from this patent.

The only problem with a car that can drive on land and ride on water is that other alternatives already exist, in the form of hovercraft, and this proposition does not seem cheaper or less complicated than the former.

The only advantage over hovercraft might be improved handling on the road, but Yamaha still has to make a business argument to support the development of this vehicle.

Before saying “Hey, I would buy that,” think that this vehicle will not come cheap, and it will probably not drive like a roof-less and windshield-less car on the road, such like an Ariel Atom.

Think of it as a small car with the weight of an SUV, but with the added advantage of traveling on water. What use would these vehicles have except for renting them for recreational purposes?

 
 
 
 
 

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