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Widebody Dodge Challenger Hellcat Redeye Hearse Rendering Looks Ominously Fast

Hearses come in many shapes and sizes, and over the years, we’ve been treated to quite a number of quirky creations. The Coleman Milne BINZ.E is a zero-emissions vehicle based on the Tesla Model S, chart-topping singer Aretha Franklin got her final ride in Detroit in a highly modified 1940 Cadillac LaSalle, and the list goes on.
Widebody Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Hearse rendering by Rain Prisk 12 photos
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Be that as it may, Estonian pixel artist Rain Prisk took the hearse genre one step further by imagining the wide-bodied Dodge Challenger with ominous modifications to the sheet metal. The sinister makeover continues with tinted windows, black Hellcat logos on the front fenders, and star-themed beadlock wheels painted in matte black.

The rear quarter windows and the doors are stock, but the muscle hearse features a longer wheelbase than the bone-stock Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody. Moving the rear axle further back made it possible for Prisk to work his magic on the roof and rear end, but you also have to think about what this means for the V8 engine.

Dodge quotes 797 horsepower and 707 pound-feet (959 Nm) of peak torque for the Redeye, outstanding figures for a road-legal car that retails at $78,695 before options. Because of the extended wheelbase, the longer drive shaft has a different torsional stiffness from the stock driveshaft. More length often means less stiffness, translating to increased parasitic losses from the HEMI's crankshaft to the driven wheels.

Turning our attention back to the exterior design, try to imagine a lower roofline and side windows for the rear section of the Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye rendering by Rain Prisk. These styling changes would morph the hearse body style into a shooting brake, a somewhat fancy name for two-door wagons from days long gone.

A shooting brake would be easier to sell than a hearse, though, and these changes would also give the Challenger a bit more legroom for the rear passengers as well as more cargo capacity. Unfortunately, wagons aren’t selling well in the United States of America because SUVs and pickup trucks reign supreme. Wagons that aren't called the Subaru Outback, that is.



 
 
 
 
 

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