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Well-Tended 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 With 8,600 Miles Looks Ferociously Handsome

The eighties gave us oodles of legendary motorcycles, but the GSX-R might just be the most esteemed of them all.
1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 16 photos
1989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R11001989 Suzuki GSX-R1100
If it weren’t for a few paint chips, we'd be quite happy to say this 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 is as clean as ever. Recently, the Gixxer saw its brakes and carburetors refurbished by the current owner, who’d also installed a Zero Gravity windshield, new Bridgestone tires and a youthful oil filter.

The bike’s fuel tank was lined and topped with an aftermarket filler cap, while its colossal four-cylinder engine received fresh motor oil. Glancing at the cockpit area, you’ll discover that Suzuki’s classic predator has only covered approximately 8,600 miles (14,000 km) since it was unboxed from its factory crate.

As for the GSX-R's fundamental specifications, its power source comes in the form of an air- and oil-cooled 1,127cc inline-four behemoth that packs sixteen valves and a quartet of 36 mm (1.4 inches) Mikuni inhalers. In the neighborhood of 9,500 rpm, the DOHC engine is capable of unleashing as much as 143 hp at the crank.

Lower down the rev range, this mean machine will go about supplying up to 86 pound-feet (117 Nm) of crushing torque. By combining these power output digits with a dry weight of 463 pounds (210 kg), the ‘89 MY juggernaut can achieve a fiery top speed of 171 mph (275 kph).

Its suspension consists of adjustable telescopic forks at the front and a full floater shock absorber at the other end. Finally, ample stopping power is provided by dual 310 mm (12.2 inches) discs and four-piston Nissin calipers up north, along with a single 220 mm (8.7 inches) rotor and a twin-piston caliper down south.

Since the Japanese icon pictured above these paragraphs is currently up for grabs on Iconic Motorbike Auctions, the next person to occupy its saddle could be you! The bidding deadline will be reached on June 1, so you’ve got three more days to decide whether your garage has enough space for another motorcycle.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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