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Well-Maintained Honda CB750 Four K6 Is a One-Way Ticket to Classic UJM Nirvana

Given how tidy this Japanese legend looks, you’d be forgiven for thinking it came straight out of a museum.
1976 Honda CB750 Four K6 27 photos
1976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K61976 Honda CB750 Four K6
The intriguing tale of Honda’s CB750 Four has been told time and time again, but it won’t hurt to remind ourselves how it radically altered the motorcycling landscape half a century ago. Development unfolded under the watchful eye of Yoshiro Harada, who’d previously been in charge of devising the DOHC-equipped CB450 of 1965.

For the more ambitious CB750 project, he opted to go with an SOHC four-cylinder engine configuration in the 750cc class. Honda would therefore target the performance-seeking side of the market dominated by British bikes at the time, though being fast was just one of many attributes deemed mandatory for this machine.

Whereas manufacturers like Norton or Triumph were yet to be familiarized with the notion of reliability, the CB750 would happily adopt the dependable nature generally associated with Honda’s lineup. Other stand-out features came in the forms of electric starters and, most notably, a disc brake arrangement for the front wheel.

This was the very first time that a production motorcycle had ever used such technology, further widening the gap between the CB750 Four and its competitors. Moreover, there was the pricing aspect: an MSRP of just under 1,500 bones made Honda’s flagship considerably more affordable than other big bikes. In today’s money, that’s about $12,500.

Ultimately, the powerplant of choice turned out to be a 736cc inline-four with two valves per cylinder, quad 28 mm (1.1-inch) Keihin carburetors, and 67 air-cooled ponies on tap. Turning the rear wheel via a five-speed gearbox, the engine’s grunt can result in speeds of up to 124 mph (200 kph). Sure enough, all this goodness made the CB750 an instant hit for both everyday riders and the press, leading to the first recorded use of the term “superbike.”

Another phrase surfacing in journalists’ vocabulary around that time was Universal Japanese Motorcycle (or UJM for short), thus highlighting these machines’ versatile and highly competent character. Now then, let’s talk more specifically about the stunning 1976 model showcased in this article’s photo gallery, as it could end up in your garage if you’ve got cash to burn!

Following the latest owner’s acquisition a few months ago, this CB750 Four K6 saw its gauges serviced, carbs resynchronized, and engine covers polished. One may also find a replacement four-into-four exhaust and youthful chrome-plated rims, which are linked to fresh spokes and hugged by Michelin Pilot Activ rubber. Power is delivered to the rear wheel via a modern drive chain, and the cockpit hosts new mirrors and control levers.

Currently located in Lawrenceville, Georgia, the Japanese artifact is waiting to change hands at no reserve on Bring a Trailer. As of now, you’d be required to spend about $8k in order to best the top bidder, but make sure you act swiftly if you’re finding that to be a tempting proposition. The online auction will be ending on Friday, December 9.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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