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Welcome, 2016 Zero FXS, We've Been Expecting You

A new Zero machine is waiting for bold riders, and this time it means more business like ever before. Enter the 2016 Zero FXS, an electric motorcycle derived from the Fx model, but tweaked for street hooliganism and race track bliss.
2016 Zero FXS 33 photos
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Zero describes the 2016 FXS as "supermoto on steroids," and considering the fact that electric motorcycles put the entire torque in action right off idle, we tend to believe that riding this bike hard around each bend of the road or track can provide quite an exhilarating experience.

The 2016 FXS comes with a revised, sportier frame made from lightweight aircraft-grade aluminium, with enhanced suspension response for a more accurate feel of what is going on with the bike in any scenario. The swingarm is a cylindrical cross tube designed for added rigidity.
Showa suspensions, Bosch ABS and quick-swap batteries
Showa suspensions are Zero's choice for the 2016 model year FXS, and the brakes are controlled by an advanced Bosch ABS modulator. On the power pack side, the 2016 Zero FXS benefits from the proven modular architecture.

This means that a rider can choose to load either one or two batteries on the FXS, as needed. Each module has a locking mechanism for added peace of mind, and swapping, loading or unloading only takes minutes.

The packs can be recharged on the bike using any outlet, or unloaded and recharged indoors with a third-party charger. The two options mean that the FXS can carry either 3.3kWh or 6.5 kWh, with the ZF3.3 or the ZF6.5, respectively.

Zero FXS comes with a max power of 27 or 44 hp, depending on the power pack configuration, and produces a peak of 70 ft-lb (95 Nm) torque. Standard charging times range from 4.7 to 8.9 hours, but using the max accessory chargers, they can be reduced to 1.5 and 1.7 hours, respectively. The bike comes with Zero's usual clutchless direct drive and a Poly Chain GT Carbon belt.

City range varies from 45 miles (72 km) to 90 miles (145 km) at an average speed of 55 mph (89 km/h), while the highway figures stretch from 26 miles (42 km) to 52 miles (84 km), at a speed of 70 mph (113 km/h).

The bike looks sleek and menacing, and can be had for $8,495 or $10,990 (equivalent to €7,425-9,605), depending on the battery pack, with the Quick-charge option setting you back some extra $600 (equivalent to €525).

Not exactly like the vicious Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, but definitely an amazing ride for the city.

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