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Volkswagen Postpones Buyback Appointment For The Most Stripped Out Golf TDI

Volkswagen’s Dieselgate settlement deal involves a buyback option for the owners of the affected vehicles.
Joe Mayer's stripped-out Volkswagen Golf VI TDI 11 photos
Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being parted outDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerConversation with VW representative regarding trading in a Volkswagen Golf TDI for Dieselgate settlementConversation with VW representative regarding trading in a Volkswagen Golf TDI for Dieselgate settlement
The said owners can sell their cars back to Volkswagen as long as they are “operable,” and they will still receive financial compensation on top of the money they receive for the vehicle. Apparently, the only rule for the buyback was to bring in an automobile that was “drivable and operable.”

Some owners of Volkswagen models decided that it would be all right if they brought in cars that were not complete, which made some people put pictures on social media that showed VW models with a few parts visibly missing.

One thing led to another, and a man from Cincinnati wanted to see just how far this could go, so he stripped out his 2010 Volkswagen Golf VI TDI. He reached a point where it was a vehicle that could be driven on its TDI powerplant, but was far away from what most accept as an automobile.

With just an hour to go before his appointment for a buyback at a Volkswagen dealer, Joe Mayer was contacted by company representatives. He was asked not to come to the scheduled appointment, which has been postponed.

The company did not specify when he should bring the car back to the dealer, but the representative informed him that the reason for the delay is linked to his actions regarding the stripping of the car.

According to Joe Mayer, the agent told him that Volkswagen believes that stripping the car was not “in the spirit of the buyback.” Instead of offering a new appointment, the VW representative e-mailed Joe with the phone number of an attorney that should answer all of his inquiries.

The German automaker responded to Jalopnik’s request for comments, and they got a reply which wrote that the vast majority of Volkswagen owners take “very good care of their vehicles,” and that they are returning them for buyback intact.

The reply also mentioned that the automaker plans to remedy the emissions systems to comply with Federal norms, and that those will be put back on the market instead of scrapping them.

In other words, Volkswagen is not happy about people bringing stripped-out cars to their buyback appointments, because it wants to make those cars compliant with emissions regulations. The facts above will make us wonder what will happen to Joe Mayer and his car, but it will be something that is now the responsibility of lawyers. We will keep you updated as soon as new information arises.

 
 
 
 
 

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