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Volkswagen Gets Sued by Major German Customer Over Dieselgate

German fish distributor Deutsche See has filed a lawsuit against Volkswagen, and it is directly linked to the Dieselgate situation.
Deutsche See Volkswagen utility vehicle 8 photos
Dismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealer
The legal action was started by Deutsche See after the company did not manage to reach a settlement with Volkswagen regarding the lease of its fleet with the automaker. The Bremerhaven-based company has a fleet of almost 500 vehicles made by the Volkswagen Group, and all of those are leased from the automaker.

Deutsche See insists that it tried to reach an amicable agreement with Volkswagen, and the company underlined the fact that it was not informed by the automaker of the existence of the “defeat device” technology in its diesel-engined vehicles.

Furthermore, those at Deutsche See are disappointed that all of the environmentally-friendly projects they proposed were not supported by Volkswagen, which included electric vehicles, and other solutions to reduce the environmental impact of its fleet.

The press release issued by the fish distributor does not mention what kind of compensation is desired from Volkswagen, but German newspaper Bild am Sonntag claims that VW is being sued for €11.9 million, which is the equivalent of $12.8 million, as Automotive News informs.

Volkswagen has admitted in September 2015 to employing a “defeat device” to make its vehicles cheat in emissions tests. At first, the fraud was recognized for 2.0-liter TDI engines of the EA189 line, but smaller displacement units were also using the technology, and it was later discovered that the V6 TDIs also had a trick up their “sleeves.”

This lawsuit is more important as a precedent for Volkswagen’s Dieselgate in Europe than the monetary compensation it could bring to the plaintiff. There’s a good chance that Deutsche See will win this case, but the legal battle could take many months or even years until a solution is reached.

The worst part for Volkswagen is that other companies might be inspired to pursue similar claims in Europe, which might be a financial disaster for the conglomerate from Wolfsburg.

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