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Volkswagen “e-Thing” Trademarked, Could Be Used for a New Electric Buggy

Remember the ID Buggy Concept that doesn’t even follow the ID. nomenclature that Volkswagen currently uses? The electric off-road vehicle may enter production given the German automaker’s trademark application for e-Thing on August 31st, 2020.
Volkswagen Thing 31 photos
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We can laugh all day about the failed opportunity to call the production model Thing-e, but the trademark is filed under Nice classes 12, 35, and 37. In other words, Volkswagen is eyeing a vehicle, retail sales, and servicing under this nameplate. For the time being, only the word has been trademarked while a design patent isn’t featured in the database of the European Union Intellectual Property Office.

Just like the ID Buzz Concept with Microbus styling, the ID Buggy from the 2019 Geneva Motor Show is based on the MEB platform of the ID.3 hatchback and ID.4 crossover. Be it rear-wheel drive for less adventurous customers or all-wheel drive for off-roading enthusiasts, the e-Thing would be quite a quirky proposition in the segment.

The only that would come close – even though it’s much larger and more expensive – is the yet-to-be-revealed Jeep Wrangler EV with Rubicon goodies. Regardless, you can’t help but imagine that Volkswagen will have a hard time selling this car in the U.S.

Other than a handful of sales in California and a few more in the rest of the country, not too many people would take the e-Thing seriously into consideration. On the other hand, just look at the original from the 1970s. Also known as Type 181, the Thing sold in the United States with a folding windshield, removable doors, a convertible roof, and only one gauge in the instrument cluster. Yup, the old-timer came with a 90-mph speedometer even though 68 miles per hour (110 kph) is the top speed.

The square-ish sibling of the Beetle featured an air-cooled boxer with 46 horsepower and 71 pound-feet of torque, and believe it or not, 60 mph took 23.8 seconds. By comparison, the ID Buggy Concept needs 7.2 seconds to 62 mph (100 km/h) thanks to 201 horsepower and 228 pound-feet of torque driving the rear wheels.

 
 
 
 
 

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