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Volkswagen Caddy eHybrid Spied With Almost No Camouflage, Just a Bit of Duct Tape

Volkswagen is working on a plug-in hybrid version of the Caddy, and it is rumored to be named Caddy eHybrid. The model is set to share its platform with the Ford Tourneo Connect PHEV, and Volkswagen did the development work for both, while the Blue Oval configured certain details on their own.
Volkswagen Caddy eHybrid prototype 18 photos
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Our spy photographers have supplied us with fresh images of the prototype, which was seen in both body versions, which are the regular Caddy, and the Caddy Maxi. The latter is the extended wheelbase model, and it is nice to see that VW has chosen against offering the PHEV with a single wheelbase configuration.

Evidently, VW has to benefit from this, as it can offer the PHEV variant to its Caddy and Caddy Maxi customers alike, and from there it will see what variant is more popular. Once the spreadsheets are filled with data, the manufacturer may decide to cut the least popular variant from the range if it is too much of a headache from a cost perspective.

The Caddy is built on a modified version of the MQB platform, which means it gets its technology straight from the Golf, while the engines and drivetrains are also borrowed from VW passenger cars. Under the hood of this PHEV model will be a 1.5-liter inline-four-cylinder engine that will be mated to a six-speed DSG dual-clutch transmission.

The 1.5 TSI motor is the replacement of the aging 1.4 TSI, and not just in hybrid drivetrains, and it will be assisted by an electric motor that is integrated between the engine and the gearbox. That means quicker engine starts, as well as seamless transitions from one kind of propulsion to the other, or at least that is how it should work in theory.

Volkswagen is set to launch this Caddy eHybrid by the end of this year, and sources claim it will be able to drive almost 60 km (ca. 37 miles) on a full charge, but that remains to be seen. 

Regarding the part with two body styles offered in a PHEV version and then cutting one from the line-up, every manufacturer does this kind of calculation.

It should be no surprise to you that every vehicle you see leave a production line is supposed to have a business plan behind it, as well as favorable estimates that will justify its existence in the range. Once the latter stops happening, it is set for a slow, but steady elimination from the range.

 
 
 
 
 

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