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Veilside RX-7 With Pop-Ups Reminds Us of When We Still Liked Fast and Furious

Have you seen the latest Fast and Furious movie? F9: The Fast Saga is how they call it and it is, without a doubt, the worst, dumbest, and unlikable movie of the series. And of the year so far, for that matter.
Veilside RX7 with pop-up headlights 9 photos
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Not long ago, I ranted a bit about the perversion of Fast and Furious. That rant was prompted by the release of the Hobbs and Shaw spinoff, one that irreversibly took the franchise into the world of spies and, yes, believe it or not, bulletproof superhumans.

Once I’ve seen that flick though, I realized I kind of enjoyed it. After all, there’s not much not to like (and expect) in Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham throwing punches left and right. And that kind of raised my expectations when it came to F9 - despite the countless warnings that hinted to the series going to space, reviving long-dead characters just to fill some plot hole, and justifying the absence of Paul Walker in the pardon-the-expression stupidest way imaginable.

And then, today, I came across this thing here. A rendered Veilside RX-7, granted, but one not unlike the one Han Lue drove during the character’s first outing in the series, in the 2006 Tokyo Drift. For the record, it was Han who was brought back in F9 (the car wasn’t), complete with a petty justification for his return, from what not-that-many-movies-ago seemed like a death no one could escape from, 

The rendering strays from the original Veilside RX-7s in that it comes with pop-up headlights, and packs an altered rear that can accommodate the stock lights. And even with these changes, the rendering still manages to remind us of a time when Fast and Furious was about cars, drivers and, to some extent, family - and not gadgetry, spies, and relatives no one mentioned, ever, throughout the previous eight movies.

That’s maybe because the guy behind the rendering, Khyzyl Saleem, is used to coming up (mostly) with plausible designs – something the Fast and Furious people should do as well, considering the (good) place where the story started, and the (rock bottom) place it is now.


 
 
 
 
 

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