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Unrestored 1959 Chevrolet Impala Hides Something Mysterious Under the Hood

1959 was the year when the Chevrolet Impala finally became a grown-up, as the nameplate graduated from the top-of-the-line version of the Bel Air to a standalone series.
1959 Chevrolet Impala 20 photos
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Needless to say, little was changed in terms of engines, so the lineup still included six cylinders and V8 options.

The base offering was the same inline-six with 135 horsepower. In comparison, the V8 family started with the standard 283 Turbo-Fire developing 185 horsepower. However, the 283 (4.7-liter) was also offered in more powerful versions rated at 230 and 250 horsepower, respectively.

The big-block 348 (5.7-liter) was the crème de la crème, and it was available with multiple power ratings, including 250, 280, 300, 315, and 335 horsepower.

The 1959 Impala sitting right here on your screen is a beautiful example that’s yet to be restored. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a complete rust bucket. Not at all, and the car's general condition is quite good, especially when it comes to the rust you typically find on vehicles that old.

The floors and the trunk will need the usual repairs, but on the other hand, the Craigslist seller says the frame is still good. A visual inspection in person is still definitely recommended to determine the current condition of this Impala more accurately.

The interior looks in a rather rough shape, and the seats seem to be beyond recovery. The good news is the Impala is approximately 95 percent complete, so nothing big is believed to be missing.

Under the hood, there’s a mysterious V8, so while the engine still seems to be there, we know nothing about it. It’s paired with an automatic transmission, but it’s obviously pretty hard to tell if it’s still running or not.

This unrestored Impala isn’t necessarily the cheapest we’ve seen, as the seller expects to get around $23,500 for it. The price seems to be fair, though the current condition of the engine is critical for the final value of the car.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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