autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

Ultra-Rare Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I Is Looking For A New Owner

Over the years, Mazda improved the design of the rotary engine. The Japanese automaker may have discontinued its Wankel legacy with the death of the RX-8, but rotary combustion will make a comeback in the following years as either a range extender for a hybrid or as the engine for the upcoming RX-9.
1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I 11 photos
1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I1967 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series I
It all started in the ‘60s, though, with the 10A engine. The company’s first production Wankel made its debut in 1965 and features a two-rotor design. And the first application for this powerplant is the very first series of the Cosmo sports car. Also dubbed 110S, the Cosmo Series I was manufactured in very limited numbers. More to the point, merely 343 were ever made.

This 1967 model is one of those ultra-rare vehicles, and wouldn’t you know, it’s in tip-top condition. Having been recently restored inside and out, the pictured Japanese icon is heading to auction with a €65,000 to €95,000 estimate to its name.

The peeps over at Bonhams will handle the sale, and when you think about it, that’s not a lot of money for a truly classic car that’s rarer than full-on hypercars such as the Porsche 918 Spyder. Even though the 982cc rotary engine makes do with only 110 horsepower, the Cosmo is light (940 kg / 2,072 lbs). Therefore, it can hit 110 miles per hour (185 km/h) with a bit of tailwind. Truth be told, that’s not bad at all for a 50-year-old car.

Other than its pretty looks and unconventional powertrain, the Cosmo also has a bit of racing pedigree to it. Mazda entered two examples of the breed in the 1968 edition of the Marathon de la Route, an 84-hour endurance race held at the Nurburgring.

One of the two Cosmos retired in the 82nd hour, leaving the other to cross the finish line 4th. “How’s that even impressive?” Well, the impressive thing about it all is that the remaining Cosmo finished behind two works-prepped Porsche 911s and a Lancia Fulvia 1.3 HF.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories