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Toyota’s Sales Went Down Significantly Last Month, And Everybody Knows Why

The latest sales figures from Toyota for the North American market show that dealing with the chip shortage isn’t by any means an easy business, and even the largest companies in the world end up being massively affected.
Toyota's NA sales went down significantly last month 15 photos
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Toyota’s April 2022 sales, therefore, dropped no more, no less than 23 percent as compared to the same month of the previous year, with the company selling just 184,960 vehicles.

Sales of the Lexus brand also went down 18 percent.

Almost every model in Toyota’s lineup suffered a substantial drop, with the Highlander, for instance, going down 29 percent versus April 2021. The Tacoma also recorded a 27 percent decline, while in the case of the Corolla, the North American sales were down 22 percent.

In case you’re wondering why Toyota’s sales are so disappointing, it all comes down to three words: the semiconductor shortage.

Just like all the other carmakers out there, Toyota has struggled to find a way to minimize the disruptions caused by the chip shortage. Without enough semiconductors to install on the vehicles it builds, Toyota, therefore, couldn’t meet all orders, with the sales eventually impacted.

Most industry experts expect the chip shortage to ease off in the second half of the year, more specifically in the last months of 2022. However, others warn that the semiconductor crunch wouldn’t come to an end so fast, so after this short recovery, more massive disruptions could be encountered throughout 2023.

Intel, which is one of the largest tech companies involved in the manufacturing of chips, says the lack of semiconductors wouldn’t be resolved until 2024. And this time, the reason is a little bit different: the industry is struggling to find the necessary parts required for the manufacturing of chips, as the equipment used for the process is also impacted by a global component shortage that’s causing disruptions in its production.

 
 
 
 
 

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