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Toyota Is Suddenly Super-Optimistic About the Chip Shortage

Just like the rest of the automotive industry, Toyota had a hard time reducing the disruptions caused by the chip shortage, with its production output obviously impacted as well.
Toyota has a very ambitious goal for this fiscal year 27 photos
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After two years of struggle, car manufacturers out there have mixed expectations for 2022, with some predicting a continued struggle due to the very constrained chip supply.

Toyota, on the other hand, seems to be very optimistic most problems would go away sooner rather than later. In fact, the Japanese carmaker is so optimistic that it reportedly expects to build no more, no less than 11 million, in the fiscal year 2022.

While the firm hasn’t publicly announced this target, it’s pretty clear that building 11 million vehicles wouldn’t be possible unless the global chip inventory improves.

In other words, Toyota is almost certain this thing can happen in the coming months, despite all the gloomy forecasts coming from various experts and analysts across the world.

But in addition to the current chip supply, the Japanese carmaker also has other things to worry about.

Toyota has recently decided to suspend its domestic operations due to what was believed to be a cyberattack. The company, therefore, halted the operations at its plants in Japan, and it’s believed the production of approximately 13,000 cars would be impacted.

Correctly predicting the chip shortage, on the other hand, seems to be more of a matter of luck at this point. Strongly tied with the global health crisis, the lack of semiconductors is seen by many as a long-term headache that just wouldn’t go away overnight.

For the time being, however, even the largest carmakers out there are struggling to find a way to reduce the disruptions the shortage causes in their daily operations. Ford, for example, has recently suspended the operations at its North American plants due to the very same reason, therefore confirming that the chip inventory continues to be as tight as in 2021.

 
 
 
 
 

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